Sutherlands Handbook - 5th Edition

() SUTHERLAND'S HANDBOOK FOR BICYCLE MECHANICS Fifth Edition Howard Sutherland Leonard Rubin John S. Allen Ed Colaian

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SUTHERLAND'S

HANDBOOK FOR BICYCLE MECHANICS Fifth Edition Howard Sutherland Leonard Rubin John S. Allen Ed Colaianni John Porter Hart

SUTHERLAND PUBLICATIONS Drawings-Susan Feichtmeir, Fredda Cassidy, Nancy Sutherland, Carlos Chavez, Mark Schroeder, Carol Loverde, Tim Keenan Emeryville, California 1990

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Sutherland, Howard, 1948[Handbook for bicycle mechanics] Sutherland's handbook for bicycle mechanics/floward Sutherland ... [et al.]; drawings, Susan Feichtmeir ... [et al.]. -5th ed. p. cm. Includes index. ISBN 0-914578-07-3 1. Bicycles-Maintenance and repair-Handbooks, manuals, etc. I. Title. II. Title: Handbook for bicycle mechanics. TL430.S95 1990 629.28'772-dc20 90-41793 CIP

Library of Congress Card Number 90-41793 Copyright © 1974, 1976, 1981, 1985, 1990 by Howard Sutherland Sutherland Publications Box 9061, Berkeley, California 94709 All Rights Reserved

Introduction This is the fifth edition of Sutherland's Handbook for Bicycle Mechanics. It is a resource for people who work in the bicycle industry and for enthusiasts as well. The information contained in this handbook was gathered from many sources and involved considerable travel, measuring and study to track down the details that make it valuable. Much of this data is available nowhere else. This edition contains many changes that reflect the changes in the bicycle industry. Indexing is covered thoroughly. Slight adjustments to the derailleurs that used to be made by the rider while riding now often need to be made in a work stand. The many details that are important to making indexing work are listed here. The spoke length section has always been an important part of this handbook. We have revised and updated this section from top to bottom to make it more thorough and easier to use. Leonard Rubin redesigned the tools and measurement procedures, and measured nearly all the 650-plus rims in this edition. (The fourth edition had 243.) I implemented many of his suggestions for improving this section. Len also contributed the headset and brake sections and helped with the indexing sections and many other parts of the book. His commitment to making this book accurate and complete is greatly appreciated. I was fortunate to be able to use the beautifully equipped shop at United Bicycle Institute to research the indexing and spoke length sections. Ron Sutphin and Wayne Martin also provided much needed encouragement and feedback. John Barnett of Barnett's Bicycle Institute supplied detailed suggestions for improving the book and was able to review parts of this edition. His new book, Barnett's Manual Analysis and Procedures for Bicycle Mechanics, is a valuable companion to this one. My wife Nancy kept the home fires burning bright. With invaluable attention to detail, she also managed to proofread and copyedit most of this edition and paste up the entire spoke length section. I·am grateful for her assistance. In the previous editions, prepaid reply cards were included to encourage readers to make suggestions and comments. I tried to incorporate as many suggestions as I could, and I certainly appreciate all the ideas I received. In this edition, I am again including prepaid reply cards, and I look forward to hearing from anyone with suggestions for improving the Handbook. Questions and comments are always welcome. I suggest you buy two copies of Sutherland's Handbook, one for the shop area and one for the order desk. You will probably be referring to them often. Many shops buy additional copies to resell to enthusiasts. Take some time to thumb through the book and become familiar with what is covered. I know you will find it useful.

June 1990

,... With thanks to the following people and organizations: My father, William H. Sutherland My mother, Betsy Sutherland and special thanks to my wife, Nancy Linn Sutherland Virginia Villani Tim Snyder Silverio Perez Leigh Moorhouse Pamela Maes Greg Middleton Larry Browning . Olivia Perish Ashland Cycle Sport Siskiyou Cyclery Pt. Reyes Bikes Rick Comar-Suntour David Berstein & Jeff Sussman-Tioga Riteway Products Ariel Trading Company Bicycle Parts Pacific Corso Distributing, Inc. Euro Asia Imports Winkel Wheel KHS Inc. Hi-E Engineering Riggio Imports & Exports Ritchey, U.S.A. Sam Patterson-SRAM Corp. (Grip Shift) Seattle Bicycle Supply Shook-Kingsberry Corp. (American Classic) Ten Speed Drive Imports Trek Bicycle Corp. (Matrix) Wilderness Trail Bikes Marti Sacks-Sun Metal Products Michael Teller Josh Deetz Jeff Tofler-Fisher Mountain Bikes Conrad Oho Sharp Bicycles, Richmond Lee Chi Chang Star Naoto Kosugi-Dia-Compe, Inc. Kip Byers Wheelsmith Fabrications The Square Wheel, Berkeley Guy-King Cycle Group Performance Bike Shop, San Rafael EI Cerrito Cyclery Richard Goodwin, Mitch Clinton, Duke Spinelli, Eric Chavez-Mavic West Glenn Reichwald-Campagnolo USA Eli Silberberger-Shimano America Corp. Jeff Gilmore Brian Williams Doug Milliken Pete Mason-Berkeley Cycle Thorsten Schaette Peter Ubelacker-Magura USA Corporation A Bicycle Odyssey, Sausalito Sam & Rick's, Oakland Amber Cycle Sports Winning Wheels Bicycle Shop, Pacific Grove ZAR, International (FIR) Troxel West Russ Okawa-Sachs Bicycle Components Mel Pinto Imports Fat Tire Trading Post, Fairfax Bontrager Cycles Grafton Performance Tye Gribb-Klein Bicycle Corporation William Clauson-Bikelab (Hiigi) Seattle Bicycle Supply

Rigida, France Araya, Japan Campagnolo, Italy Wolber, France Mavic, France FIR, Italy Alesa, Belgium Angle Lake Cyclery, Seattle Jevelot Western States Imports Quality Bicycle Imports Cycles Peugeot West Gita Sporting Goods, Ltd. J&B Importers West Sachs-Huret, Inc. Ashby Avenue Bike Doctor, Berkeley Karim Cycles, Berkeley Laquieta Caldwell Ruby Wiles Skip Gathman Rick Caldwell The Typesetting Shop John Uthe-Shimano Chris Allen-SunTour USA Mike DaSilva Dave Wilson-New Zealand Bill Homer-Bianchi Todson, Inc. Richard McKown-Sun Metal Products Nationwide Cycleparts Supply Ltd. Sal Corso-Stuyvesant Bicycle Jim Merz-Specialized Bicycle Jack Kelly-Zeus Lee Katz Bernie Wuthrich-Weinmann Sports, Inc. The Components Company Joe Breeze Linne Gravestock Don Milberger Peter H. Davis James Hargett Steve Brown Brian Grieger Chris Lewis Tom Ruth Phil Wood & Co. Bernie Smith Mike Schwering Bicycle Exchange, Cambridge Bicycle Repair Collective, Cambridge Doug Hooten Eli Rubin - Berkeley Wheel Works International Bicycle Center, Allston, MA Frank Berta Gary Fisher Shaw's Lightweight Bicycles, Santa Clara Faber's, San Jose Carol Loverde Jane Bernard Dale Smith Louise Lacy Lois Rosner Howard Feldenkreis Tom Hignite Aurora Typesetting Branciforte Bicycles, Santa Cruz John Temple-Sturmey-Archer Russ Johnson-Shimano

Egbert Eghart-Steyr Daimler Puch O. Morad-Sachs, Canada Ay Caramba Burritos Karin Koller Hillary Male Dan Cole Howie Cohen John Porter Wayne Campbell Kathy Campbell Beverly Anderson Fred Willkie Albert Eisentraut Jim Bellas Todd Wehner Greg Toleman Laura Belkin Pete De Fremery John Smith Peter Rich Lee Maniscalco Bob Muzzy Andrew Ritchie Dennis Stone-Stone' s Bicycles, Alameda Kiyoshi Teraska-Kawamura Cycle Co. Missing Link Bicycle Shop, Berkeley Berkeley Cycle Velo-Sport, Berkeley College Avenue Cyclery, Oakland Hank and Frank's Bicycles, Oakland Chevy Chase Bicycle Shop Georgetown Cycle Sport Jones Bicycle, Long Beach Los Alamitas Schwinn Schwinn Sales West Safety Cycle Shop Cycles Peugeot West Coast Cycle Supply Gitane Pacific Lawee, Inc. Linder Euro Imports I. Martin Imports Shimano Sales H. McIver, Inc. Campagnolo, USA Yamaha International Corp. Merry Sales Schwinn Bicycle Co. Belleri, Inc. Raleigh Industries of America, Inc. Wilson Bicycle Sales Carlisle Tire and Rubber National Bicycle Dealers Association Ron Kitching's Handbook Andy Alpine Michael Phillips Charles Alpert The Briarpatch Fred DeLong and Jerry MathisCollins-Phillips Tool Corporation, Escondido, CA (for producing a custom vernier perimeter tape that made possible much more accurate rim measurement) and everyone who wrote with suggestions.

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CONTENTS CONTENTS

TRANSMISSION

INDEXING

WHEELS AND BRAKES

FRAMES AND FITTINGS

SECTION HOW TO USE THIS BOOK • Symbols • Class of Fit • Thread Standards • Thread Measuring • Nationality of Parts • Standards Evolution • Materials • Cutting Operations • Fits and Tolerances • Bearings • Hand Tools

0

PEDALS· Sizes • Markings • Toe Clip Bolts

1

CRANKS, CHAINWHEELS, CHAIN • Crank Cotters • Cotterless Crank Axles • Crank Extractors • Cotterless Crank Installation • Fit Between Arm and Axle • Crank Bolts • Chainwheel Interchangeability • Chain

2

BOTTOM BRACKETS • 3-Piece Cranks • Cup Markings • Cup Lockrings • Thompson (Thun) •I-Piece Cranks·· Low Profile Cranks • English Cottered Axles • Shell Widths • Cottered Axle Centers • French Cottered Axles • Other Cottered Axles • Cup-Axle Compatibility • Cotterless Interchangeability • Cotterless Replacement • Cartridge-Bearing Units • Campagnolo Axle Identification

3

FREEWHEELS, FIXED GEARS • Ball Sizes • Body Thread Sizes • Interchangeability • Body Markings • Hub-Freewheel Spacers • Problems • Removing Freewheels • Removers • Single-Speed Freewheels • Fixed Gears • Freewheel Sprocket Replacement • Freewheel Sprocket Interchangeability Charts

4

INDEXING • Checklist • About Indexing • Adjustments • Cable Casing and Casing Stops • Brazed-on Lever Bosses • Freewheel-Dropout Spacing • Chain Recommendations • Troubleshooting CAMPAGNOLO AND SACHS SHIMANO SUNTOUR OTHER MAKES

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6 7 8 9

HUBS • Ball Sizes • Cone Wrench Sizes • Front Hub and Axle Chart • Rear Hub Dimensions • Freewheel Clearance • Chainlines • Rear Hub and Axle Chart • Thread Chasers • Quick Release Units • Var Tool Markings

10

SPOKE LENGTH • About the Spoke Length Charts • Large Flange Hubs • Radial Patterns • Spoke and Nipple Directions • Calculating Spoke Length • Calculating Rim Correction Factors • Number of Spokes

11

TIRES • Tire and Rim Types • Rim and Tire Fit • Rim Sections • Tire Markings • Measuring Rims' and Tires • Tire Size Charts • Tubular Tire Sizes Valve Hole Sizes

12

CALIPER BRAKES • Side-pull· Center-pull· V-Brakes • Cantilevers • Roller-Cams • Miscellaneous Brakes

13

HEADSETS, STEMS, HANDLEBARS· Size Standards· Markings· Binding • Replacing Stacks • Mixing Parts • Steerer Length • Tips • Dimensions • Stem Diameters • Handlebar Diameters

14

FRAME TUBES, FORK ENDS, SEAT POSTS· Diameters • Gear Hangers • Rear Fork End Threads • Replacing Forks • Seat Posts

15

APPENDIX • Appendix Contents • Markings and Abbreviations • ISO Standards • Books • Wire Gauge Comparison· Weight Conversions • Tap Drill Sizes • Spoke Length Formula • Assembly Checklist • Bicycle Parts in 6 Languages • Length Conversions • Gear Formula • Geared Hub Gear Ratios • Gear Charts • Index

16

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1990

0-1

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK SYMBOLS

These symbols will be used to help you find the information you are looking for.

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BALLSIZES

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THREAD SIZES

+

Things to watch for; helpful information

ID The easiest way to identify a part CL.ASS 0 F FIT

This system of grading will be used to help you choose the right combination of parts for a job. Because of shortages of parts and a lack of international standards it .may be necessary to use a part that doesn't quite fit properly. Hopefully this "make do"style of bicycle repair won't be necessary in the future. Class A

Made to fit

Class B

Will fit and be serviceable but slight damage to the parts may result.

Class C

Looks like it might work but won't.

THREAD STANDARDS

International Standards Organisation (I.S'.O.)

British Standard Cycle (B.S.C.), American Standard

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Metric Standard

0-2

rev. 1985

Italian Standard, Whitworth Standard

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK THREAD MEASURING EXAMPLE: 9/16"x20 TPI ~ ~

r-rhe first number refers to the nominal diameter of the male part. When actually measured as in figure A, it is frequently slightly undersize. The second number refers to the number of threads per inch (TPI) or the number of millimeters per thread as measured in FigureB with a thread pitch gauge. Threads must be clean when measuring. Any rocking motion back and forth indicates an incorrect match. These numbers do not give you any information about the standard used in cutting the threads and this is where some confusion arises. For instance Italian headsets and English headsets would seem to be interchangeable with a class A fit. Italian headset threads 25.4mmx24 TPI English headset threads 1" x 24 TPI Since 25.4mm = 1 inch it would seem they were the same. However, you will notice by comparing the Italian and the English standard for cutting threads that the angle of the threads is different. There may be a mismatch, although slight, to an English fork fitted with an Italian headset or an Italian fork fitted with an English headset. For this reason it should be considered a Class B fit.

correct Figure A

incorrect Figure B

0-3

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. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK NATIONALITY OF PARTS

Parts will be listed as English, French, Italian, Swiss,

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u.s. or Austrian to show the standard used in cutting the

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thread or the size of the part. Manufacturers, however, do not always use their national standard and different sizes are used instead. For this reason Raleigh and Schwinn will be listed separately. Other exceptions do exist and will be noted when possible.

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Country of Origin does not necessarily indicate the national standard for a part. For instance, French bicycles exported to the u.s. on a large scale use English freewheel threads.

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COUNTRY

STANDARD USED

Australia Austria Belgium Canada Denmark Englalld Finland France Germany India Italy Japan Mexico Netherlands Norway Raleigh Schwinn Spain Sweden Switzerland United States

English English, Austrian English, some French English English English* English French English English Italian English, U.S. ** Italian English English English unless listed separately English unless listed separately French English French unless listed separately U.S., English

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*Please note exceptIons under Bottom Brackets and Headsets. **Japanese bikes imported to the United States are either U.S. standard ,or English standard. Generally, if it has an Ashtabula (c)ne-piece) crank it is U.S. standard; if it has a three-piece crank it is English standard.

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rev. 1985

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. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK International Standards and de facto Standards Bicycle mechanics and shop owners dream of the day when there are standard sized parts for bicycles. The costs in duplicated inventory, labor wasted in trial and error, and customer aggravation at not being able to buy a seemingly simple part-add up to a lot of frustration and wasted money. In fact, there are standards. But there are so many of them. Back when American bicycles were sold in the u. S., French bicycles in France, Italian bicycles in Italy and English bicycles most everywhere else ... national standards worked most of the time. In the early 1970s, however, when the demand for high-quality lightweight bicycles brought bicycles from allover the world to the U.S., much confusion resulted. In addition to national standards there are de facto standards. Sizes for many BMX bikes, for example, are based on the Schwinn sizes because when BMX first got started, Schwinn components were the most durable. The marketplace determined the standard. A similar situation exists for the high-quality multi-speed market. Because Campagnolo has been used by top riders. for years, a company making parts for this market has needed to make them interchangeable with "Campy?' So there is a Campagnolo standard. Knowledge of what's likely to show up on a bike is helpful, but the industry needs more than "what's likely?' Standards, standards, standards. Why doesn't somebody come up with one set of standards? Somebody has. Manufacturers and representatives from other groups from countries that manufacture bicycles met in Geneva and over a period of years came up with standards for the International Standards Organisation or ISO. The ISO is an international agency, a meeting ground for representatives of national standards organizations such as the U.S: American National Standards Institute. The ISO attempts to standardize dimensions, markings and safety requirements to increase compatibility, help international trade and reduce product hazards. Standards are introduced slowly to avoid disruptions in trade. (continued on next page)

1985

0-5

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK International Standards and de facto Standards (cont.) The ISO tries to make new, standardized equipment work as often as possible with existing equipment. For this reason, despite the trend elsewhere toward metric standards, many of the ISO bicycle standards are based on English measurements. ISO thread form is slightly different from English, but parts are still compatible. Axle threads, wrench flats and the like, which require the use of standard tools in manufacture or servicing, are metric in the new ISO standards. Throughout this edition we have included" the ISO standards along with the various national standards. In addition, more detailed specifications are included in the Appendix.

0-6

1985

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. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK MATERIALS

Working on bicycles requires some basic knowledge of metals and their characteristics. Contrary to the current use of the word in the bicycle trade, alloy does not mean aluminum, but rather indicates a mixture of metals. An alloy is generally a base metal such as steel or aluminum with relatively small percentages of alloying metals that impart desired characteristics to the base metal; these include strength, hardness, wear resistance, machinability, and corrosion resistance. The characteristics of a metal can be changed further by heat treating and/or work hardening. ALUMINUM Pure aluminum is a soft, weak metal with very good corrosion resistance. To be used for bicycle parts it is alloyed with other metals to increase its strength and make it heat treatable. As this alloying degrades the corrosion resistance, most aluminum parts are anodized to protect against corrosion. Generally this coating is clear, although black and other colors are finding their way into bicycles. STEEL The most common steel used on bicycles is carbon steel, which ranges in carbon content from a few tenths of a percent in some frame tubes to about one percent in springs. Generally, the higher the carbon content the stronger the steel. By adding small amounts of other metals such as chromium, molybdenum or manganese, much stronger steel can be produced. These alloys are generally found in higher quality frame tubes.

Heat Treating Most steel can be hardened by a variation of two general techniques: tempering and case hardening. High carbon steel and many steel and aluminum alloys may be tempered. In this process the material is heated to a specific temperature and then quenched to harden it. The parts are held at another low temperature for an appropriate length of time to lower the internal stresses and draw back the hardness to the desired point. This leaves the part uniformly hard throughout. Case hardening can be used on low carbon steel, which generally cannot be tempered by the process of heat treating. Case hardening loads the surface of the part with a material, usually carbon, that will allow the surface to become quite hard while leaving the core unhardened. This is desirable to give a hard-wearing surface and a nonbrittle body. Case hardening also involves heating and quenching.

0-7

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. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK MATERIALS (cont.) Work Hardening Another method of hardening, sometimes unintentional, is by work hardening. Bending, pounding or manipulating the metal causes it to harden. This can be demonstrated by putting a sharp bend in a piece of wire and then attempting to straighten it. The bent part obviously has hardened and will not straighten to its original form. This characteristic makes it difficult to properly straighten a bent fork blade because the bent section is now harder than the unbent section.

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Annealing Annealing is the process of softening metal by heating and slowly cooling.

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CUTTING OPERATIONS

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TOOL STEEL Cutting tools that are intended to cut steel are made of a special class of steel called tool steel. Tool steels may be either high carbon or alloy steel. Alloy steels are generally called high-speed steel, as they retain their edges at the temperature generated by high-speed cutting. Carbon steel tools are less expensive than high-speed steel and are generally quite adequate for thread-cutting, reaming and milling when the job is done by hand. The greater cost of high-speed steel is justified by increased durability when driven by a power tool. Drill bits for cutting steel should always be high speed, as they will surely be used with a power drill. Regardless of the material used, all metal cutting tools have delicate, brittle cutting edges that are easily damaged by misuse. Many more cutting tools are broken than worn out. Do not throw them together in a box or a drawer. . . LUBRICATION AND COOLING When using cutting tools, both the tool and the piece to be cut must be properly lubricated and cooled with cutting oil. Most metal cutting done on bicycles is in steel or aluminum. For best results in steel, use a high-sulfur base cutting oil available from hardware stores. It is also adequate for aluminum. Motor oil, bicycle oil, WD 40, or yesterday's coffee will not do in a pinch! You will dull your tools and do an inferior job unless you use the right cutting oil in the right quantity. Dabbing a little oil somewhere on the tool or work before cutting is a waste of time. The heat and friction are at the cutting edges. Keep them flooded with cutting oil throughout the operation.

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. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK CUTTING OPERATIONS (cont.)

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SHARPENING Even under the best conditions cutting tools get dull. Mechanics throw razor blades away after a few shaves, but expect a tap to cut steel forever. It will, of course, but only if you get it resharpened before it gets so dull that it breaks off in a hole. Quality drills, taps, dies, mills, reamers, and the like can all be resharpened at a fraction of their replacement cost! When the tools don't seem to cut as cleanly and effortlessly as they did when new, look in the Yellow Pages under "Grinding-Precision and Production." Most large cities will have at least one shop that can do this type of work.

DRILLING Probably the most common metal cutting operation is drilling. Like other power cutting operations it requires eye protection and lubrication. The two lips on the end of the drill do all the cutting and should be kept flooded with cutting oil. The point between these lips is a small chisel that does not have a sharp edge and must be forced into the work. When drilling larger diameter holes you will find it much faster and easier to drill a pilot hole equal in size to the chisel edge on the larger drill. All drills, even when properly sharpened, make a hole larger than the drill bit by a small percentage. When improperly sharpened, this error may become quite large and the hole may not be round. Drilling with a dull bit causes overheating of the work, the bit, the motor and the operator. The undue friction can cause the walls of the hole to become work hardened, which may lead to tap breakage if you attempt to thread the hole. THREAD CUTTING It is important that the hole or .shaft size be appropriate for the tap or die being used. (For tap drill sizes for common fasteners see Appendix page 16-8). If the tool is required to remove too much materi'll, it will bind and possibly break. If too little material is removed, the thread will not be strong enough. In practice, the thread profile is never as sharp as the drawing on page 0-4. The strength of a thread is not improved significantly by exceeding 60% of the theoretical thread height pictured in the drawing.

Since all the cutting is done by the first few threads of the tap or die, these edges must be flooded with cutting oil during the threading operation. Failure to adequately lubricate these edges will result in rapid dulling of the tool and torn and ragged threads in the work.

0-9

,...

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK CUTTING OPERATIONS (cont.) When threading, the tool should be reversed periodically to break the chip that is formed by the cutting edge. When threading a deep, small diameter hole such as the rear axle adjuster in a dropout, the tap should be backed out completely and chips removed from the tool to prevent binding and breaking. When cutting large diameter fine pitch threads such as bottom brackets and steer tubes, the cutting tool must be accurately aligned with the work. A die stock with an accurate guide must be used on steer tubes and a piloted double tap set must be used on bottom brackets to assure proper alignment of the bearing races and minimize tool wear or breakage. It is important to use the proper tap handle or die stock and rotate evenly with both hands to prevent side thrust, which may result in broken tools and ruined work. THREAD CHASING Thread chasing is distinct from tapping in that it is not cutting threads, but is reforming damaged threads. Taps and dies designed for cutting threads may be used for this purpose as well as cheaper tools that are adequate only for chasing. While it may seem to be a much easier job, use care and flood with cutting oil as in thread cutting. Most bottom bracket "thread chasers" have little or no pilot, making it difficult to align the tool with the hole. When chasing righthand threaded bottom bracket threads with a pilotless tap, use a lockring threaded onto the tool to help judge straightness. MILLING (FACING) & REAMING The ends of the head tube and bottom bracket must be cut accurately so that they are parallel. Facing assures alignment of the bearing races and freedom from binding. The head tube must also be reamed so that the pressed bearing races will fit into the head tube properly. Facing and reaming operations are done with special cutters made for the job. As with other cutting operations the tools must be sharp and well flooded with the proper cutting oil. Generally, the face of the tube should be milled until the tool is cutting all the way around the hole. GRINDING Grinding may be us,.ed on any steel. It may be used on hardened steel, as normal cutting tools will not work. Grinding is a hazardous operation, requiring guards, eye protection and proper technique. Grinding wheels must be sharpened and formed with a "wheel dresser" to give good results. Do not attempt to grind non ferrous metals such as aluminum or brass! Use a file or power sander for these soft metals or they will clog the pores of the grinding wheel.

0-10

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK CUTTING OPERATIONS (cont.) FILING AND SAWING These methods of metal cutting have much in common: They are generally done without lubrication. Always use top quality files and saw blades; their increased life makes them well worth the purchase price. Select the proper grade or teeth per inch for the material to be cut. Use fine teeth close together for steel or thin material. Use larger teeth further apart for aluminum or thick material. At least two teeth should be in contact with the work at all times. Cut away from your body using a smooth slow stroke. Release pressure on the back stroke to protect the edges of the teeth. Files should be cleared of chips after a few strokes to prevent clogging, which affects speed of cutting and the quality of the job.

FITS AND TOLERANCES Parts that are made to be assembled together must be designed to fit each other. The desired degree of tightness of the fit and the size of the parts determine the tolerance or amount of variation permitted on dimensions or surfaces of the parts. On threaded parts the pitch of the threads and the length of the engagement must also be considered. Unfortunately, poor quality control in manufacturing can alter the results of even the best designs. Many of the "interchangeable" bicycle parts are so poorly made that to get a good fit several "identical" parts must be tried. This shortcoming applies to some of the best known and most expensive components in the industry. Measuring a sample of bottom bracket components showed that several of the major Japanese manufacturers hold very good tolerances, but they are the exception. It is fortunate that bicycles are forgiving machines due to their simplicity, flexibility and light loading. As bicycles become more important as vehicles for basic transportation, let us hope quality control improves.

0-11

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK BEARINGS BEARING DESIGN Bearings are used to minimize friction and heating where various parts rub against each other. The type of bearing used almost exclusively in bicycles is the ball bearing; it is very efficient, easy to fit, and inexpensive. Ball bearings fall into three general classifications which dictate their design and application: radial bearings which are designed to be loaded at right angles to the axis of the shaft, thrust bearings which are designed to be loaded on the axis of the shaft, and a combined radial and thrust bearing which will accept some loading on both axes. The separate cup, cone and ball arrangement used on most bicycles is of the radial/thrust type. The major load on bicycle bearings is radial, except for the high thrust load on the headset lower bearing. Bicycle bearings are lightly loaded and rotate slowly. This allows the use of inexpensive, rather crude bearing surfaces. Except in very expensive components these surfaces are stamped or machined rather than ground true to a fine finish. Grinding would add more to the cost than the minimal decrease in friction can justify. Cartridge or sealed bearings are finding their way into quality bicycle components. These bearings, commonly used in industrial applications have the balls captured between inner and outer races making up a one-piece unit. (In a normal bicycle bearing the cups and cones are the races.) These cartridge bearings are very precisely made and may include felt or plastic seals to hold in grease and keep out dirt and water. While this type of bearing is vastly superior, it lacks •one important virtue that the cup/cone type bearing does have: it will not tolerate nearly as much misalignment as the cup/cone bearing can (and must). The thin flexible axl~ and the narrow spool of a standard bicycle hub cannot hold cartridge bearings in alignment. A larger diameter spool is required, to keep the outer races aligned as the rider imposes both radial and thrust loads on the hub flanges. Similarly, the axle inside the hub must be larger in diameter to keep the inner races precisely lined up. Good design can accomplish this without a weight penalty.

0.1'.

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HOW TO USE THIS BOOK BEARING MOUNTINGS

A bearing is no better than its mounting. The smoothness, efficiency, and longevity of bicycle bearings can usually be improved by refining the mountings found on the average bicycle frame. For general instructions on reaming, tapping and milling, see section on cutting operations, above. Procedures for specific bearings follow.

Hubs The rear drop-outs and the fork ends are an important part of the wheel bearing mounting., If the hub is clamped between non-parallel surfaces, the thin axle will bend and mis-align the cones. Fork end alignment gauges are made by Campagnolo, Park and VAR to check and correct the alignment and spacing of fork ends. (See Figures 1, 2 and 3.) These tools are a combination gauge and lever for bending the fork ends into alignment.

Figure 2. Fork ends out of alignment

Figure 1. Fork end alignment gauges installed

Figure 3. Fork ends aligned

0-13

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK BEARING MOUNTINGS (cont.)

Head Tube The head set bearing cups seat in the ends of the head tube~ The inside of the tube must be accurately reamed for a press fit and the ends of the tube must be milled parallel to align the cups. Bicycle Research Products, Campagnolo, VAR, and Zeus make tools which will do both of these operations; some head tools also serve as a press to install the cups. As shown in Figure 4, the head tool has a T-shaped handle, a flat milling cutter and a reamer mounted on a threaded rod. The rod is inserted in the head tube and a centering cone, a spring, and a star nut are installed at the other end of the tube. The nut should be tightened to compress the spring about half way. Flood the work area with cutting oil and rotate the tool clockwise, looking down on the handle. Do not reverse direction as this may cause the tool steel cutting edges to chip. As the tool turns, the reamer will go into the tube until the milling cutter contacts the tube face (Figure 5). More spring tension may be needed at this point. Further rotation will cut the face of the tube at precisely 90° to its axis. Continue cutting until there is bright metal all the way around the tube. (It may be necessary to remove the tool to check this.) After one end of the tube is finished, repeat the procedure for the other end. After both ends are done, clean the metal chips and cutting oil from the tube. The tool may be used to press the cups into the head tube. A centering thrust washer is installed between the reamer and the bearing cup, as shown in Figure 6. The centering cone and spring are not used in this operation. Make sure the cups start straight, then turn the handle until they are pressed tight against the tube ends (Figure 7).

flat milling cutter reamer

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centering cone spring star nut

Figure 4. Assembly for milling and reaming head tube O.lJ

Figure 5. Milling and reaming head tube

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

reamer _ centering thrust washer bearing cup

star nut

Figure 6. Head cup press assembly

Figure 7. Installing head cups with press

BEARING MOUNTINGS (cont.) Steer Tube To assure that the threads on top of the steer tube are aligned with the tube axis, the die cutting them must be held in a die stock provided with a suitable guide, (Figure 8). The top cone of the head set bearing depends on these threads for its alignment. Campagnolo, VAR, Zeus make the proper tools for this job. Fork Crown Where the steer tube enters the fork crown the diameter of the tube and the top of the crown must be machined to accept the headset bottom cone. This job is best done on a lathe, but an acceptable 'job may be done with a crown race cutter as made by Campagnolo, VAR or Zeus (Figure 9). The tool is slipped over the steer tube and the spring compressed to apply downward pressure to the hollow cutter. Using cutt"ing oil rotate cutter clockwise until it leaves a complete circle of bright metal on the fork crown. Clean the fork and drive the bearing cone in place with a hollow slide hammer or a piece of 1" water pipe.

Figure 8. Steer tube thread cutting

Figure 9. Fork crown race cutting

0-15

+

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK BEARING MOUNTINGS (cont.)

Bottom Bracket The threads and the faces of the bottom bracket shell are the mount for the crank bearing cups. Even if these are accurately machined, they will probably be distorted during the brazing of the frame. Bicycle Research Products, Campagnolo, VAR and Zeus all make a double tap with an aligning pilot shaft that may be used to correct or cut these threads. Select the proper taps for the bottom bracket to be cut. (English and Swiss standards require left-hand threaded tap on chainwheel side,' right-~and threaded tap on other side.· French and Italian standards use right-hand threaded taps on both sides.) Inspect the inside of the bottom bracket shell to make certain that none of the frame tubes extend into the path of the cutters. If they are in the way, they may damage the taps. Use a file for the slow and tedious job of removing the unwanted tube ends. Install the taps on the handles and insert the pilot shaft through the bottom bracket shell and into the hollow handle (Figure 10). Flood with cutting oil and start both taps into the shell at the same time (Figure 11). Run the taps in until there are enough threads to accept the bearing cups. Remove one tap and replace it with the flat facing mill and aluminum pilot (Figure 12). Insert the handle onto the protruding pilot 'shaft until the cutter is against the shell. Using cutting oil, press in and turn clock-wise (do not reverse) until the bright metal shows all the way around the end of the shell (Figure 13). Repeat on the other end of the shell, changing taps if required. Clean up chips and oil, incillding the chips hiding in the chain stays, and install the bottom bracket. A bottom bracket shell that has stripped or badly damaged threads may be made as good as new by converting to Italian standard threading, unless it was already Italian thread. Remove the old threads using a Bicycle Research Product Bottom Bracket reamer on one side of the double tap handle, with a tap matching the threading in the shell threaded into the other side (Figure 14). Using cutting oil, push the reamer into the shell while turning it clockwise until the old threads are removed. Continue turning clockwise while pulling the reamer out of the shell. Without removing the tap, replace the reamer with an Italian tap and cut new threads. Leave the Italian tap in the shell and remove the other tap. Replace this tap with the reamer and repeat the reaming and threading operations. This fast easy repair saves a ruined frame for the cost of the bearing cups and twenty minutes work. The old spindle may be used if serviceable. O.lll

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK BEARING MOUNTINGS (cont.)

In Conclusion Always keep in mind that a bearing may only function if it is rigidly and accurately mounted. The more precise the bearing, the more vulnerable it is to misalignment.

Figure 10. Installing double-sided tap with aligning shaft

Figure 11. Starting taps aluminum pilot facing mill

Figure 12. Milling assembly

Figure 13. Milling bottom bracket face

Figure 14. Reaming bottom bracket shell to remove stripped threads

0-17

,..

. . HOW TO USE THIS BOOK HAND TOOLS Screwdrivers, pliers, wrenches, hammers and various special tools are used in bicycle repair and assembly. The quantity, quality and profitability of work done in a shop generally matches what is found on the work bench. A good tool is a long term investment, but a poor or missing tool continues to run up expensive labor costs. Screw heads marred by a dull screwdriver or nuts rounded by an adjustable wrench tell a customer where not to take his or her bike next time. For a shop doing repair work on all makes of bicycles many tools are needed. Consider the tools in the following list as a basic minimum for a profitable shop. Wrenches 6mm through 17mm combination 6mm through 17mm box end 1/4" through 5/8" combination 13mm through 17mm cone wrenches Pedal Wrench 6",8", 12" and 16" adjustable wrenches 8mm through 15mm socket wrenches Metric Allen Set (2mm - 10mm) Inch-size Allen Set Screwdrivers 1/8" or 3/16" wide blade type 1/4" or 5/16" wide blade type Various sizes Phillips-type Pliers 8" Slip Joint 7" Diagonal Cutter 6" Long Nose 12" Channel Lock Cable Cutter SIS Cable Casing Cutter Hammers 1/2 lb Ball-peen 1 Ib Rubber Mallet

0-18

1990 rev.

1 each 1 each 1 each 1 each 1 1 each 1 each 1 each 1 each

1

1 3

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

..

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK Miscellaneous Center Punch Set Pin Punches 5" Bench Vise, 50 lbs or more in weight 6" (15cm) Calipers 6" (15cm) Machinist Scale 6' (2-Meter) Tape 2.5-Meter Flat Metric Tape 18" Straight Edge Hacksaw Files Thread Pitch Gauge, Metric and English 6" Bench Grinder Grinding Wheel Dresser Wire Wheel 3/8" Drill and Bits Special Bicycle Tools Every type Cluster Tool you can find Every type Crank Extractor you can find Shimano Ball Cup Tool Spoke Wrenches 1/2" and 9/16" left and right Pedal Taps Bottom Bracket Fixed Cup Remover Bottom Bracket Lock Ring Tool Bottom Bracket Peg Spanner Cotter Pin Press Cup Press Third Hand Brake Tool Fourth Hand Brake Tool Chain Wheel Tool Axle Thread Chasers Various special Shimano Tools Chain Rivot Extractor Dropout Alignment Tool Shimano Derailleur Hanger Wheel Dishing Tool Repair Stand Truing Stand Phil Spoke Cutter Threader Sutherland's Handbook

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 each 1 1 1 1 1

en C

~

:cm

= r> 2

0

~

en

:c

> 2

1 each 1 each 1 1 each 1 each 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 set 1 each 1 1

0

eo

0 0

~

.."

0

= ...eo

n -< n rm 3: m n

Alignment Tool 1 1 1 1 1 1

:c

> 2

...n en

ONE LAST WORD ABOUT TOOLS: Cheap tools are an extravagance no bicycle shop can afford.

rev. 1990

0-19

,...

.';.

,

0-20

1990

PEDALS PEDAL-CRANK BALL SIZES: Most pedals use 10 to 15 - 5/32" balls per bearing or 1/8" balls. THREAD SIZES ISO* Primary Alternate English French** Italian U.S.A.

1/2" x 20 TPI Right- and left-handed thread 9/16" x 20 TPI Right- and left~handed thread 9/16" x 20 TPI Right- and left-handed thread 14mm x 1.25mm Right- and left-handed thread 9/16" x 20 TPI Right- and left-handed thread 1/2" x 20 TPI Right- and left-handed thread

Italian threads are slighly different than English and are a tighter fit in English threaded cranks. * See Appendix for more details on ISO standards. ** Peugeots and some other French bicycles have used English 9/16 x 20 TPI for the U.S. market since the mid '70s. French cranks can easily be tapped to 9/16 x 20. When. retapping pedal threads start from the back of the crank arm.

10 10

MARKINGS ON WRENCH FLATS Campagnolo, others Zeus English, Italian 9/16 x 20 BSC French 14 x 1.25 no mark MARKINGS ON CRANK ARMS English French Italian

10

European 9/16 x 20 14 x 1.25 9/16 x 20

Japanese no mark M14

PEDAL CODES FOR RIGHT- AND LEFT-HANDED THREADS English French Italian Spanish

Right

Left

R D D

L

D

I

G S

TOE CLIP BOLT-PEDAL The following use 5mm x 0.8mm threads: Pedals

Toe Clips

Campagnolo Lyotard Olympic Pro Ace Zeus and most others

Christophe KKT Milremo Verme with threaded holes rev. 19851-1

CRANKS, CHAINWHEELS, CHAIN ~--

C/)

u ...

thread size

Z

... = Cd U

Italian Japanese

o ~

~

o o

= Z Q

~~ >~ =~

Axles within each center size category are arranged in order of increasing right side. In cases w.here this right side is the same they are listed in order of increasing left side. Many of the axles listed are no longer being made and are listed only so that replacements can easily be made. Hercules, Brampton, Bayliss Wiley and Phillips that have only the old stamping number are no longer manufactured. Phillips with 7 digit numbers listed, Raleigh, TDC, Japanese JBG and RFG axles are still available. .:

~

'iJ

rIJ.

:i . ~

e ~

112 14

3

Chopper.

rwenty

Delivery (Carrier)

BOTTOM BRACKETS I~""'------ overalllength·---------..·1 - - -.. .~. ~ ~ ~-t-----L-..r

~---.. ..... ~ left



. . . . . ._ ..r-----......

---.j-

center

.1..

right ~

BOTTOM BRACKET SHELL AND COTTERED AXLE CENTER WIDTHS This chart lists only tendencies. There are exceptions so measure to be sure. Axle centers listed are mostly for cottered axles. Bottom bracket axles are made to be used with a specific cup thickness. Different cup thicknesses may cause interchangeability problems.

English (for Raleigh, see below)

Cottered Axle Shell width centers 2 19/32" - 2 518" 2 1/16" (66-67mm) often (52.5mm) listed as 68mm

French

68mm

54.5 - 56.5mm

Road and track

Italian

70mm 65,68,70mm

56.5 - 58mm varies

Road Track

Japanese

68mm 71mm

52 - 53mm 55mm

Varies

Uses Road and track

Exceptions: Cinelli (model 74mm SC for several years in the '60's) Raleigh

2 13/16" (71mm) 2 5/32" (55.0mm) 3" (76mm)

27/16"

(62.0mni) Thompson (Thun)

65mm,70mm

see page 3-3

Most Raleighs except bikes with 24 TPI threads. Tourist, Chopper, Twen~y, others 3 piece style cranks with pressin cups and threaded axles.

COTTERED BOTTOM BRACKET AXLES AXLE END DIAMETER ISO* English French Italian

Nominal 16mm 5/8" (15.88mm) 16mm 16mm

Actual 15.9mm 15.75 - 15.80mm 15.9mm 15.9mm

*See Appendix for more detail on ISO standards. rev. 1985

3-5

(.H

SUTHERLAND'S HANDBOOK FOR BICYCLE MECHANICS

I

~

French bottom bracket axles are catalogued by overall length overall length left Gitane-all black 130 33 134 35 138 35

center

right

markings on axles

56 56 56

41 43 47

none none none

Motobecane-all black 55 134 36

43

none

136

35

56

45

none

138

35

56

47

none

notes ~

~

~:i

:c 0

Original equipment on Motobecane until '74, used with Solida cranks. Origin.al equipment on Motobecane from '74 until present, used with Solida and Nervar cranks. For Nervar cranks on Gitaneand other French bikes..

Peugeot~blackends, unpolished middle, polished left and right sides

140 142 145

42 42 43

5543 55 45 55 47

RFG-marked RFG 135 37 54 137 37 54 140 40 54 135 (see note)

44 46 46

none none none

13554C 13754C 140 54C 68 135

~

0

Original equipment to fit folder Original equipment to fit V08, AD8, A018, V018e

Original equipment on Sutter and other French bikes. Balls run in grooves on axle, cups are extra thick and not interchangeable with others.

*Peugeot axles and cups are not interchangeable with others.

8

3: ~ ~ ~ ::0 ~ » o n > ~ > u .... =: o u..

Example: Replacing an SR (Sakae Ringyo) R68 Complete Bottom Bracket Set with a Sugino MW 68. Comparing the Center Width Factors: SR (Sakae Ringyo) R68 66.5 Sugino MW68 67.5

=

The difference of 1.0 indicates one more thread will show with the lockrings removed. Comparing the Axle End Factors: SR (Sakae Ringyo) R68 7.5 7.0 Sugino MW68

~

o

o

= Q Z

The ,difference of 0.5 indicates the chainwheels will be moved 0.5 millimeters closer to the frame.

C/)

CHART C (facing page)-REPLACING FIXED (right) CUP ONLY

« :c ~

Q

5. Look up the Fixed Cup Factor for the cup to be replaced. 6. Find a cup with a similar factor to replace it with. If the factor is larger, the cup will be "thicker," the chainwheels will be closer to the frame and more threads will show on the adjustable cup. 7. Compare the differences in factors to the estimates you made in steps 2 and 3.

Z

« ~

=: (.U

:cE-

Example: For English cups replacing a Sugino Mighty cup with a Stronglight cup.

::J C/)

Sugino Mighty Stronglight

4.0 2.0

This 2.0 difference will move the chainwheels 2.0mm away from the frame. It will also make 2 less threads (2mm) show on the adjustable cup.

3-12

1985

BOTTOM BRACKETS

REPLACING ADJUSTABLE CUPS Adjustable cups are similar in thickness to fixed cups. A thicker adjustable cup may be substituted when the center width change indicates too few threads for the lockring to thread onto. A thinner cup may be used when the center width change indicates too many threads are showing (or simply use a thicker lockring if looks are that important.) SPACERS FOR FIXED CUPS Cluster spacers or Sturmey Archer spacers work well to move the axle end out or make the bottom bracket shell wider. Make sure you have enough threads for the lockring. This does not work for Italian bottom brackets. CHART C-FIXED CUP FACTORS

Make Campagnolo thin thick Nervar Ofmega cadmium plated chrome plated Shimano (old) Dura-Ace* pre-'85 (new) Dura-Ace after '85 Stronglight SR (Sakae Ringyo) Sugino Maxy Mighty SunTour Specialized TA Tange IDC Zeus

Lockring Italian Thickness

English

French

2.0 4.0

2.5 4.5

2.5 4.0

2.5

2.5

-

3.0 3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

2.5-4.0 4.0 3.5 3.0 4.0 3.5

-

-

1.5 4.0 2.0 3.5

1.5 4.0 1.5 3.5

1.5 4.0 2.0

4.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.5 1.5 3.0

4.0 4.0 4.0

4.5 4.0 4.0

-

-

2.0

3.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.5 3.5 3.0 3.5 5.0 3.5 3.5

-

2.0

-

*Old Dura-Ace cups had larger holes to accommodate a larger diameter axle. Not interchangeable with others.

rev. 1990

3-13

SUTHERLAND'S HANDBOOK FOR BICYCLE MECHANICS (,H.

... I

~

CHART A AXLE ONLY No. on Axle

Avocet Double (USA-new) Triple (USA-new) Double (old style) Triple (old style)

I.

CHART B COMPLETE BOTTOM BRACKET SET ONLY French Italian English

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

. Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

74.5 75.5 77.5 77.5

6.. 0 10.0 7.5 12.0

67.5 68.0 68.0 68.0

20 30 2 3

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

6.0 10.0 6.5 11.0

68.0 69.0 68.0 68.0

I.

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

5.5 9.5 6.5 11.0

68.0 68.5 70.0 70.0

5.5 9.5 5.5 10.0



Campagnolo-to match model to axle measurement see "Campagnolo Axle Information" on page 3-28 through 3-31.

Balls Shell Center Right Super Record, (C-)Record 3/16" 68 52 28 3/16" 68 52 29 3/16" 68 52 32 3/16" 68 52 33

Thick Thick Thick Thick

Axles not interchangeable with others

67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0

3.5 4.5 7.5 8.5

68.0 68.0 68.0 68.0

3.0 4.0 7.0 8.0

3.5 4.5 7.5 8.5

3/16" 70 3/16" 70 3/16" 70

32

Thick Thick Thick

Complete sets are interchangeable; see interchangeability notes, page 3-28.

68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5

69.0 69.0 69.0

5.0 6.0 10.0

70.0 70.0 70.0

4.5 5.5 9.5

69.5 69.5 69.5

4.5 5.5 9.5

29 28

Thick Thick

69.0 I 67.0

4.5 6.0

I 70.0

68.0

4.0 5.5

I 69.5

68.5

4.5 5.5

67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0 67.0

4.5 6.5 8.0 9.0 13.0 15.0 19.0

68.0 68.0 68.0 68.0 68.0 68.0 68.0

4.0 6.0 7.5 8.5 12.5 14.5 18.5

68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5

4.5 6.5 8.0 9.0 13.0 15.0 19.0

54 54 54

1990- Record 7/32" 68 52 7/32" 70 54

27

28

Cups*

}

1/4" Ball Axles Thick 70.0 1/4" 68 49.5 31 1/4" 68 49.5 33 Thick 70.0 1/4" 68 49.5 34 Thick 70.0 1/4" 68 49.5 35 Thick 70.0 1/4" 68 49.5 39 Thick 70.0 Thick 70.0 1/4" 68 49.5 41 1/4" 68 49.5 45 Thick 70.0 * Cup thickness with which axle is nonnally supplied

6.5 8.5 9.0 10.0 14.0 16.0 20.0

I

~

::0

\0

o

~

1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4"

70 70 70 70

51.5 51.5 51.5 51.5

30 31 32 33

Thick Thick Thick Thick

72.0 72.0 72.0 72.0

1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4" 1/4"

70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70

56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5 56.5

26 27

Thin Thin Thin Thin Thin Thin Thin Thin Thin Thin

77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0

29 30 31 34 35 38 40 44

I 81.0 1/4" 74 60.5 30 Thin * Cup thickness with which axle is nonnally supplied

I

ti: ...

,

S3INYH3=:1W =:I'l3A3IH HOd >lOOHONYH S,ONY'lH=:IHLnS

SUTHERLAND'S HANDBOOK FOR BICYCLE MECHANICS W I

~

Q\

CHART A AXLE ONLY

::0

\0

.0

~

-:-

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

2 3

74.0 74.0

11.0 17~0

68.0 68.0

9.5 15.5

68.0 68.0

9.5 15.5

70.0 70.0

9.5 15.5

115 117 121 126

76.0 75.5 76.0 76.0

7.5 8.5 12.0 16.5

69.5 69.0 69.0 69.0

7.5 8.0 12.0 16.5

69.5 69.0 69.0 69.0

7.0 8.0 12.0 16.5

-

-

No. on Axle

Galli Double Triple Nervar Single Double (5 pin) Double (3, 5 arm) Triple Ofmega Children's Track Double Triple

CHART B COMPLETE BOTTOM BRACKET SET ONLY English French Italian

60C 68 P 70P 68 C 70C 68 Ca 70Ca

67.5 75.5 77.5 75.5 77.5 75.5 77.5

12.0 5.0 4.0 8.5 7.5 13.0 12.0

60.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

11.0 4.0 3.0 7.5 6.5 12.0 11.0

60.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

11.0 4.0 3.0 6.5 5.5 11.0 10.0

60.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

-

10.0 3.0 2.0 5.5 4.5 10.0 9.0

Single (Track) - (old)

68 W 107 70 W 109 Double - (old) BB-7200 68 W 112 BB-7200 70W 113 Double - (old) BB-7300 (7500) 68 S 107 BB-7300 (7500) 70 S 109

1 >

Axle not interchangeable h h * WIt ot ers.

J .

Single (Track) BB-7600 68-S 69.0 8.5 70-S 71.0 8.0 BB-7600 68 W 112 69.0 11.5 BB-7400 Double • 71.0 11.0 BB-7400 70 W 113 11.5 BB-7400 68-W 69.0 11.0 BB-7400 70-W 71.0 *Axle is larger in diameter and doesn't fit hole in current Dura-Ace cups. Axle end is also slightly larger (see page 2-7).

...., ....,

~O

00

~

3:~ 0 = tr1 ~ ~ ~ ~

~.~0 ~

"'0 ~

~

>" ~3: () ~

~

~

=-> e; Cl

[T1 ....,

tr1

(1"\ J

Cl~

r-

"'0

~

= z~

~~

68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

2.0 1.5 6.5 6.0 2.0 1.5

68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5

2.0 1.5 6.5 6.0 2.0 1.5

68.5 70.0 68.5 68.5 70.0

1.5 1.0 6.0 5.5 1.5 1.0

68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

3.5 3.0 6.5 6.0 6.5 6.0

68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5

3.5 3.0 6.5 6.0 6.5 6.0

68.5 70.0 68.5 70.0 68.5 70.0

3.0 3.5 6.0 5.5 6.0 5.5

70~0

00

0

~

~~

Shimano Dura-Ace (also see Maxy-Type Cotterless Axle Chart for other Shimano Axles)

oo~ ~ 0 ~ ~

~

tf~

Ntr1

~~

"'-'Cl

== > Z C1 tr1

> ~ ~

~ ~

~

~

.--... ~

o

= ~

~

~

v

,.-..~

~O

CHART A AXLE ONLY No. on Axle

Solida Single (Track) Double Triple Mountain, BMX Specialized Double

(i ~

~

\0

o

~

118.5 122 125 129

107-68 109-70 Campagnolo double (pre '85)112-68 113-70 114.5-68 Triple 115.5-70 Campagnolo, TA triple 119.5-68 (pre '85) Specialized Mountain triple 120-68 Campagnolo, TA triple 120.5-70 (pre '85) Specialized Mountain triple 125-68 Specialized Mountain triple 127-68 Sugino Mountain triple 130-68 Stronglight Single (Track) 113 Double (w15 pin cranks) 118 Double (w/5 arm cranks) 120 121 (Peugeot) 123 Triple 125 126 (Peugeot) Tandems 130 Tandem Triple 133 Mountain Bike 134.5

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

CHART B COMPLETE BOTTOM BRACKET SET ONLY English French Italian Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0

8.0 12.0 15.5 13.5

68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5

8.0 12.5 15.5 13.5

68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5

8.5 12.5 16.0 14.0

70.0 70.0 70'.0 70.0

8.0 12.0 15.5 13.5

70.5 72.5 70.5 72.5 70.5 72.5 70.5

4.0 4.0 8.0 7.0 9.5 8.5 14.5

67.5 69.5 67.5 69.5 67.5 69.5 67.5

2.0 2.0 6.0 5.0 7.5 6.5 12.5

67.5 69.5 67.5 69.5 67.5 69.5 67.5

2.0 2.0 6.0 5.0 7.5 6.5 12.5

67.5 69.5 67.5 69.5 67.5 69.5 67.5

2.0 2.0 6.0 5.0 7.5 6.5 12.5

70.5 72.5

10.5 13.5

67.5 69.5

8.5 11.5

67.5 69.5

8.5 11.5

67.5 69.5

8.5 11.5

70.5 70.5 70.5

13.0 14.0 16.0

67.5 67.5 67.5

11.0 12.0 14.0

67.5 67.5 67.5

11.0 12.0 14.0

67.5 67.5 67.5

11.0 12.0 14.0

78.0 77.0 76.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0 77.0

5.0 8.0 10.0 11.0 13.0 15.5 16.5 20.0 23.0 15.5

70~0

5.0 8.0 10.0 11.0 13.5 15.5 16.5 20.0 23.0· 15.5

69~5

5.0 8.5 10.5 11.5 13.5 16.0 17.0 20.5 23.5 16.0

71.0 70.0 69.0 70.0 70.0 70.0 70.0 70.0 70.0 70.5

5.0 8.0 10.0 11.0 13.0 15.5 16.5 20.0 23.0 15.5

69.0 68.0 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5

68.5 67.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 68.5

I

~

.....:J

SOINVHO:fW :f'OAOIO HOd >lOOOONVH S,ONV'H:fHLnS

~

~

Q

~

>~ r;:~

~~

= trj

~~ 10 ~~

:a~ ~

0

~~

;-~ (1~

=-> = (1 ::1~

VI

-c

trj

=

~ ~ ~ Z

(JQ

t-T1 VJ

0

Itrj ~~ ~

~~ ~1(1

== 0 ~ 3: ~ to

~ ~ s::

n

~ [T] ~

,.-..

8 ~ ~

'-'"

en

SUTHERLAND'S HANDBOOK FOR BICYCL'E MECHANICS (.N I

l-' QC

CHART A AXLE ONLY No. on Axle

Center Width F.actor

Axle End Factor

CHART B COMPLETE BOTTOM BRACKET SET ONLY English French Italian Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

66.5 66.5 68.5 66.5

2.5 7.5 5.5 14.0

66.5 66.5 68.5 66.5

3.5 8.0 6.0 14.5

69.5

67.5

1.5

68.0

2.0

67.5

1.5

Center Width Factor

Axle End Factor

SR (Sakae Ringyo) Royal (for other SRs see Maxy-TypeCotterless Axle Chart)

T-68-S R-68 R-70 R-68-T

Single Double

71.0 71.0 73.0 71.0

5.0 9.5 7.5 16.0

Triple Sugino75, Mighty (for Sugino Maxy see Maxy-TypeCotterless Axle Chart) Single (Track) MS-68 or MW-68LP 71.0 4.0

00 5.5

1Il

Double (Road)

Triple

MW-68 or MT-68LP MW-70

71.0 73.0

9.5 7.5

67.5 69."5

7.0 5.5

68.0 70.0

7.5 5.5

67.5 69.5

7.0 5.5

MT-68 MT-70

71.0 73.0

13.5 11.5

67.5 69.5

11.0 9.5

68.0 70.0

11.5 9.5

69.5 69.5

11.0 9.5

70.0 72.0 70.0 72.0

5.5 6.0 8.0 9.5

67.0 69.0 67.0 69.0

3.5 4.0 6.0 7.5

68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

3.0 3.5 5.5 7.0

68.5 69.5 68.5 69.5

3.5 4.5 8.0 7.0

76.0 76.0 75.0 75.5

6.5 9.5 14.0 16.0

69.5 69.0 68.5 69.0

6.0 9.0 13.0 15.0

69.0 68.5 68.0 68.5

6.5 9.5 13.5 15.5

71.0 70.5 70.0 70.5

5.0 8.0 12.5 14.5

75.0 77.0 75.0 77.0 75.0 77.0 75.0 77.0

0.5 -0.5 5.0 4.0 9.0 8.0 14.0 13.0

68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

0.5 -0.5 5.0 4.0 9.0 8.0 14.0 13.0

68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5 68.5 70.5

0.0 -1.0 4.5 3.5 8.5 7.5 13.5 12.5

68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0 68.0 70.0

0.5 -0.5 5.0 4.0 9.0 8.0 14.0 13.0

SunTour (see Maxy-type chart for other axles) Superbe, Sprint 68-S 70-S Cyclone-Maxy-Taper (Vx) 68-W 70-W TA,Tevano Single (Track) 314 Double 344 373 Triple 374 Zeus Single (Track) 109 x 55P Cronos, New Racer 109 x 57P Double (Road) 114 x55C 114 x 57C 118 x 55C 118x57C Triple 123 x 55T 123 x 57T

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BOTTOM BRACKETS MAXY-TYPE COTTERLESS AXLES Stamped numbers and letters are consistent enough among makers that dimensions can be listed. Left sides may vary among makers. TAPER ON AXLE END Two different tapers have been used on Maxy-type axles: 2 0 and 3 o. They can be distinguished by their different stampings and numbers. 3 0 axles are quite rare, used mainly with the out-of-production SR Silver crankset. 3 0 axle ends are too wide to fit far .enough into a 2 0 crank for the fixing nut to engage the axle-end stud. CRANK AND AXLE COMPATIBILITY The square taper of 2 0 Maxy-type axles is similar to that of Stronglight and TA. Maxy-type axles are longer than most others; for comparison, see axle-end factor in chart. The square taper of most other cranks and axles, including top-of-the-line Japanese, is too narrow and/or short to be compatible. BOTTOM-BRACKET CUP C,OMPATIBILITY )

Nut-type axle

Bearing race diameter is smaller than for most other spindles except English cottered. Do not interchange cups without testing position of bearing track (se~ page 3-'8). BOTTOM-BRACKET SHELL WIDTH The single-digit number stamped on the axle frequently indicates the shell width it is to be used with. 3 is for 68mm bottom-bracket shells and 52mm axle centers. 5 is used for 71nlm shells and 55mm axle centers. 2 indicates a 50.5mm center. Cup thickness varies, soitmay be possible to use an axle with a 55mm center with extra-thin cups in a 68mm bottom bracket, or an ax'Ie with a 52m.m center with extra-thick cups in a 71Illm bracket.

MAXY-TYPE AXLE PLEASE NOTE: There are exceptions and additional letters in the complete axle chart. In this position D - indicates Bolt Type*. No mark - indicates Nut Type. F - indicates SR polished race Bolt Type. *-B after marking also indicates Bolt Type; example: D-3NL = 3NL-B.

This position indicates the approximate right (chainwheel) side axle length. His 30.5mm. A, L & J are 32mm. P & N are 35mm. Sis 37.5mm.

D -3 N L""

In this position 2 indicates 65mm bottom bracket width (50.5mm axle center). 3 indicates 68mm bottom bracket width (52mm axle center). 5 indicates'70mm bottom bracket width (55mm axle center---Shimano 13olt-Type is listed as 54mm).

This position indicates the approximate left side axle length. S means shorter than original. L means longer than original. Original in this example would be a"D-3N axle. rev. 1990

3-19

SUTHERLAND'S HANDBOOK FOR BICYCLE MECHANICS ~

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68mm SHELL WIDTH - 2° Series -'

Crankset used with

Low Profile cranksets used with

Nut-Type Marking

Sante

BoltType Marking

Sugino BoltType Marking

Old Marking**

D-3K* 68-S**

Double

3H 3L,3J 3A 3P 3N

Triple Single

D-3H D-3L D-3A D-3P

3H-B 3J-B 3K-B*

D-3~

3N-B

68-W**

D-3NL Mountain

3NN 3SS D-3SS ~S, (3S), 3S2 3Y D-3T

Double Mountain

Double

3NN-B 3S-B

3T-B 3TM-B

3f

R3T D-3U Triple Mountain

3U 3X

Triple Mountain

3R

3TR-B 3U-B

3R-B

Mountain

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3TR-B 3RR-B

3M 31e *Despite similar markings D-3K and 3K-B are not interchangeable. **Old markings - do not confuse with current Dura-Ace markings.

68-T

Old Shimano Marking

A

28 31 30.5 68 W 116 32 .. 32 68 W 119 32 32 34.5 36 68 T 121.5 32 35 37.5 32,' 37.5 35 39 42 32 35 . 40.5 32, 35 39 42 35 35

B

C

D

Axle End Factor

52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52

28 30 30.5 32 33.5 35 36 36 36 37.5 37.5 37.5 39 39 39 39 39 40.5 40.5 40.5 42 42 42 42 43.5 45

108 114 113 116 117.5 119 120 122.5 124 121.5 124.5 127 123 128.5 126 130 133 124.5 127.5 133 126 129 133 136 130.5 132

4.5 6.5 7.0 8.5 10.0 11.5 12.5 12.5 12.5 14.0 14.0 14.0 15.5 15.5 15.5 15.5 15.5, 17.0 17.0 17.0 18.5 18.5 18.5 18.5 20.0 21.5

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70mm SHELL WIDTH - 2° Series

Crankset used with

Low Profile cranksets used with Sante Double

Nut-Type Marking

D-5K D-5H ·D-5L D-5LL D-5A D-5P

5H 5L 5LL 5A 5P

Triple

BoltType Marking

Sugino BoltType Marking

:: Old

Old

Marking**

Shimano Marking

5J-B

70-W** Single

5N

5N-B

Double

5SB 5SP 5SS 5S, (5S)

D-5NL D-5SP D-5S

5S-B 70-T

itt·

Double

5T-B 5U-B

. Di 5T

Sf

D~5U

A

27 30.5 30.5 70W 119 32 31 30.5 .32 70W 122 32 33.5 32 30.5 70 T 124.5 32 35 32 35 32 35 35 . "\'

Triple

5U 5R *Shimano lists bolt-type as having 54mm centers and nut-type as having 55mm center. **Old markings - do not confuse with current Dura-Ace markings.

B*

C

D

Axle End Factor

54 55 55 55 54 55 55 55 55 55 55 55 55 55 55 55 55 55

27 30.5 32 32 32.5 33.5 34 35 35 36 37.5 37.5 ' 37.5 38.5 39 40.5 40.5 42

108 115 117.5 119 117.5 119 121 122 122.5 123 121 124.5 127.5 125.5 129 127.5 130.5 132

3.5 7.0 8.5 8.5 9.0 10.0 10.5 11.5 12.0 12.5 14.0 14.0 14.0 15.0 15.5 17.0 17.0 18.5

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A

B

C

D

Axle End Facts,r

68S 68K 2S 2R

32 32 32 32

50'.5 50.5 50.5 50.5

32.5 36 37.5 42

115 118.5 120 124.5

9.0 12.5 14.0 18.5

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BOTTOM BRACKETS MEASURING CARTRIDGE-BEARING UNITS FOR THREADED BOTTOM BRACKETS

Sealed Bottom Brackets with Mounting Rings (mounting rings not shown) total length left length

center width (does not include mounting rings)

right length

I

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Bottom Brackets with Cartridge Bearings Mounted in Cups total length

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3-22 rev. 1985

Bullseye Rollerbracket Axles come in 1/4" increments from 4 1/4" to 5-1/2". Chainline is adjustable.

Length

Use with

Model

Taper

Note

For uses compare axle lengths to Phil for rough equivalents

41/4" 41/2" 43/4" 5" 5 1/4" 5 1/2"

Universal Universal Universal Universal Universal Universal

User adjustable end factors total User adjustable end factors total User adjustable end factors total User adjustable end factors total User adjustable end factors total User adjustable end factors total

3.0 9.5 15.5 22.0 28.5 35.5

108 114.5 120.5 127 133.5 139.5

Edco

Use with Taper Double Triple

Campagnolo Campagnolo

Left Axle End . Left Factor Length 6.0 6.0

Center Width 67 67

23 23

Right Length 26 30

9.0 13.0

=3 o~

116 120

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Model

Taper

Double

Vl19/23 EVl19/23 V127/25 EV127/25

Maxy-type Campagnolo Maxy-type Campagnolo

Triple

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Model numbers below are preceded with L66BSA for English, L66FRA for French and L66ITA for Italian. Chainline is not adjustable. Cottered ends are also available.

to

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Right Axle End Total Factor Length

FAG

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Installation: Edco bottom brackets are available with English, French and Italian threading. Use standard bottom-bracket tools. Also available is a friction clamp that allows installation in unthreaded or stripped bottom-bracket shells.

o

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Left Axle End Factor 8.0 7.0 14.0 13.0

Left Length 22 22 27 27

Center Width 73 73 73 72

Right Length 25.5 25.5 27 27

Right Axle End Factor 11.5 10.5 14.0 13.0

Total Length

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Mavic Identification: Old style 600 series had flat conventional lock rings. 610 series have lockrings that mate to a beveled bottom bracket shell. The bottom bracket shell must be beveled with special Mavic cutting tool 652/653. 610 URD is the current model designation. Chainline is adjustable.

Use with

Taper

Model

Track 610URD 110 611RD Track 610URD 114 Double Double long 610 URD 116 612RD ,610 URD 119 Triple 613RD Triple long 610 URD 123 613LRD 615RD Mt. Bike Mt. Bike Symmetric VTT 616 RD 124 VTT 616 RD 134

Left Axle End Factor

Left Length

Center Width

Right Length

Right Axle End Factor

Total Length

Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo Campagnolo

3.5 4.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 7.5 8.5 16.5

16 17 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 28

78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78

16 17 18 20 20 23 25 27 29 28

3.5 4.5 5.5 7.5 7.5 10.5 12.5 14.5 15.5 15.5

110 112 114 116 116 119 121 123 125 134

Campagnolo Campagnolo

11.0 16.0

18 23

88 88

18 23

10.5 15.5

124 134

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Installation: Use standard bottom-bracket tools. Unlike most others, Nadax sealed units do not allow chainline adjustment.

t='

Use with Campagnolo double Campagnolo triple

Model #2 #3

Taper Universal Universal

Left Axle End Factor

Left Length

5.5 8.0

19.0 21.5

Center Width 76 76

Right Length 20.0 23.5

Right Axle End Factor 8.5 12.0

Total Length 113 119

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All crank bearings are adjustable from side to side. Installation: Use Phil Wood mounting rings and tool. English, French, Italian, Raleigh and Chater Lea threading is available. Cottered axles are also available. All crank bearings can be ordered with custom axle end factors. (:ompatibility with other brands: Construction is similar to SunTour. Phil mounting rings can be used with SunTour cartridges; however, SunTour mounting rings are too loose for Phil axles. Width of axle center between bearings is different.

Use with Track, Campagnolo Low-Profile double Campagnolo pre- '85 double Campagnolo pre-'85 triple, TAdouble, Stronglight double, Deore triple, Mountain bike TA triple, Stronglightdouble Tandem crossover Mountain bikes, BMX Mountain bikes, BMX

Model

Taper

Left Axle End Factor

Left Length

Center Width

Right Length

Right Axle End Factor

Total Length

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Universal Universal

4.5 5.5

24 25

60 60

24 28

4.5 8.5

108 113

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Universal

8.0

27.5

60

31.5

12.0

119

#4 #5 #6 #7

Universal Universal Universal Universal

8.0

27.5 35 Custom Custom

60 60 60 60

37.5 35 Custom Custom

18.0

125

15.5 Custom Custom

130

15.5 Custom Custom

135 140

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Stronglight Identification: Dimensions of all Stronglight series are very similar. 600: All steel unit. 650: Titanium axle, aluminum cups. Chainline not adjustable. Assembles like a conventional bottom bracket, except has cartridge bearings. 651: Same as 650 except with steel axle.

Usewith Model Double Triple

Taper

600,650,651,700,701 600,650,651,700,701

Stronglight Stronglight

Left Axle End Factor 6.5 6.5

700: Aluminum cartridge threaded at ends for lockrings 701: Same as 701 but full-length threads. Recommended for aluminum frames.

Left Length 19.75 19.75

Center Width 77 77

Right Length 21.25 27.25

Right Axle End Factor

Total Length

8.0 14.0

118 124

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Sugino

Use with

Axle Marking

Taper

Single Mighty Double Mighty, Guines Double Maxy, others Mountain bike

MS MW,Guines SB RRB

Mighty Mighty Maxy-type Maxy-type

Left Axle End Factor 9.0 9.0 10.5 18.5

Left Length 16.0 16.0 16.0 24.0

Center Width 75 75 75 75

Right Length 18.0 21.5 26.0 31.0

00

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3.5 7.5 14.0 19.0

~

Total Length 114.5 118.5 129 136

~ n [T]

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Right Axle End Factor

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Identification: These are cartridge bearing units in individual cups, like the Stronglight 650.BB-SC Series.

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SunTour Identification: The "Sealed Bottom Bracket" is a single-unit cartridge 60.5mm long with mounting rings, similar to Phil Wood. SS series dimensions are identical to SA series, but SS is heavier. The "Direct Sealed Bottom Bracket" uses the same axles, but the bearings are installed into cups; the central shell is installed when unit is assembled into bicycle.

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Installation: Use SunTour tool #TA-230. Mounting rings or cups are available in English, French and Italian threading. Follow instructions for installation using lockrings.

~~

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"SEALED BOTIOM BRACKET" (Series SA and SS)

Use with

Axle Marking

Model

Track Double Triple BMX Double Triple BMX Mountain

SPB-TK SPB-RD SPB-RD3S SPB-MX VX-RD VX-RD3S VX-MX VX-MB

SA-IOO, SA-110, SA-120, SA-130, SA-190, SA-160, SA-140, SS-150

Left Axle End Left Length Factor

Taper SS-100 SS-110 SS-120 SS-130 SS-190 SS-160 SS-140

Campagnolo (Superbe) Campagnolo (Superbe) Campagnolo (Superbe) Campagnolo (Superbe) Maxy-type (Vx) Maxy-type (Vx) Maxy-type (Vx) Maxy-type (Vx)

3.0 7.5 5.5 13.5 5.0 10.5 12.0 15.5

Center Width

Right Length

60.5 60.5 60.5 60.5 60.5 60.5 60.5 60.5

23.75 28.25 33.25 31.0 32.25 35.75 34.5 35.25

23.5 28.25 26.25 34.5 24.25 29.75 31.0 34.75

Right Axle End Total Factor Length 3.0 7.5 13.0 10.5 13.0 16.5 15.5 16.5

108 117 120 126 117 126 126 131

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"DIRECT SEALED BOTIOM BRACKET" (DS Series) Identification: DSBB ("Direct Sealed Bottom Bracket") is a single-diameter cartridge 64mm long, available in English thread only, for BMX and mountain bike. Do not confuse with SunTour Type A, which has a stepped cartridge 60.5mm long. Cups use lockrings; available in English only. Installation: Use standard bottom-bracket tool set.

Use with Axle Marking BMX DSBB-VX-MX Mountain DSBB-VX-MB

Model DS-200, DS-210 DS-220~ DS-230

Taper Maxy-type (Vx) Maxy-type (Vx)

Left Axle End Left Length Factor 29.25 12.0 33.5 16.5

Center Width 64.0 64.0

Right Length 32.75 33.5

Right Axle End Total Factor Length 15.5 126 16.5 131

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BOTTOM BRACKETS

• CAMPAGNOLO BOTTOM BRACKET IDENTIFICATION MARKINGS Number in this position indicates bottom bracket shell width in mm. " "

/

Letters in this position indicate intended use: SS - Road P - Track SP - Road or Track

68-88-120- Road axles (marked SS) with a X3

X3 indicates the axle ~ was intended for triple chainwheels.

3-digit number here are pre-1978. The 3-digit number was used to indicate ideal rear hub width, 120 in this example. This number lasted longer for track axles.

When identifying Campagnolo Bottom Brackets it is best to use all the available evidence. Start with the marking on the axle. There are many different axles with the same marking, so next identify the ball sizes it is used with. Most axles use 1/4" balls. Axles with a Imm step between the bearing surface and the main shaft use 3/16" or 7/32" balls. Next measure the axle center to determine if it normally is used with thick cups or thinner cups (see column B). Then, if needed, measure the right side, the left side and the overall length to confirm you have an exact match. In the tables under cups, rifled refers to the spiral grooves in the hole

INTERCHANGING CAMPAGNOLO BOTTOM BRACKET PARTS Ball sizes cannot be interchanged. Each axle is designed for a specific ball size and cup size and cannot be mixed. Interchanging Complete Bottom Bracket Sets (Axle, Cups and Ball Cages) Generally, complete bottom bracket sets with the same overall length of axle and marked with the same shell width can be interchanged without moving the chainline. Examples: The following complete bottom bracket sets are interchangeable: 68-SS Chorus length Illmm 68-SS Croce d'Aune length Illmm 68-SS (C-)Record length Illmm Interchanging Bottom Bracket Axles only Generally bottom bracket axles that use the same ball size and have the same length, and same center size can be interchanged without moving the chainline. Example: The following bottom bracket axles are interchangeable: 68-P-120 (old) Record Track length I09mm 68-SS Victory length 109mm Moving the chainline: Substituting a 68-SS Chorus axle at Illmm for a 68-SS Victory axle at I09mm will move the chainline out Imm. Studying the charts carefully and noting the similarities of the dimensions will show many other substitutions that are possible when moving the chainline is permissible or needed. Interchanging Cups Super Record cups interchange with (C-)Record (pre-1990 with 3/16" bearings) cups Croce d' Aune cups interchange with Nuovo Record cups. Chorus cups interchange with Athena, Triomphe, (old) Record and Gran Sport cups. Thick, sealed cups for mountain bikes are the same thickness for spacing purposes as thick, rifled hole cups.

3-28

1990

BOTTOM BRACKETS CAMPAGNOLO BOTTOM BRACKET DIMENSIONS Pre-1978 Bottom Brackets (If the marking +1.0-+1.5 appears in addition to the other markings see 1978 axles note below.)

Super Record with 3/16" balls No.-size Balls Marking /cage on Axle

A

14-3/16" 65-P-110

25

14-3/16" 68-P-110 14-3/16" 68-P-120

D

Cups

Chainwheels

Models

54.0 25

104

thin*

Track

Super Record

24 26

57.0 25 57.0 26

105 109

thin* thin*

Track Track

Super Record Super Record

14-3/16" 68-SS-120

29

52.0 32

112

thick, rifled*

Double

Super Record

14-3/16" 70-P-120 14-3/16" 70-SS-120

25 29

59.0 25 54.0 30

109 113

thin* thick, rifled*

Track Double

Super Record Super Record

B

C

* Aluminum with steel insert

1/4" Ball Axles 11-1/4"

65-P-110

26

51.5 26

104

thin

Track

(old) Record

11-1/4" 11-1/4"

68-P-110 68-P-120

25 27

54.5 26 54.5 27

105 109

thin thin

Track Track

(old) Record (old) Record

11-1/4" 11-1/4"

68-SS-120 68-SS-120

29 27

49.5 33 54.5 30

112 112

thick, rifled* thin

Double Double

Nuovo Record (old) Record, Gran Sport

11-1/4"

68-SS-120 X3

27

54.5 35

117

thin

Triple

(old) Record, Gran Sport

11-1/4"

70-P-120

26

56.5 26

109

thin

Track

(old) Record

11-1/4" 11-1/4"

70-SS-120 70-SS-120

30 27

51.5 31 56.5 29

113 113

thick, rifled* thin

Double Double

Nuovo Record (old) Record, Gran Sport

11-1/4"

70-SS-120 X3

27

56.5 35

118

thin

Triple

(old) Record, Gran Sport

11-1/4"

74-SS-120

27

60.5 30

117

thin

Double

(old) Record, Gran Sport

1978 Axles In 1978, Campagnolo double and triple crank arms and axles were modified. Track cranks and axles were not changed. The double and triple axles were lengthened 1.0mm on the left and 1.5mm on the right. The axle markings in 1978 were the pre-1978 markings with +1.0-+1.5 added. What is now marked 68-SS was marked 68-88-120+1.0-+1.5. These long, confusing markings lasted about a year and were replaced by the markings 68-88, 70-S8, 68-88 X3 and 70-,88 X3 for the corresponding axles. The letter Z found on many pre-1978 axles was dropped in 1978. To identify the crank arms, look at the collar around the axle hole on the back of the arm. The pre-1978 style has a raised collar 5-6mm wide and 2mm high. The 1978 and later crank arms collars were 10mm wide and 3mm high.

1979 thru current Bottom Brackets Changes: In 1978 road axles for double chainwheels became 1.0mm longer on the left side and 1.5mm longer on the right than the corresponding pre-1978 axles. The rear hub width marking on the axle was dropped for road hubs. In 1985 the 109 axles were lengthened to 111 by adding 1mm to each side.

1990

3-29

...

BOTTOM BRACKETS

• CAMPAGNOLO BOTTOM BRACKET DIMENSIONS (cont.) 1979 thru current Bottom Brackets Super Record, (C-)Record and (1990 - current) Record These axles have a Imm step between the bearing surface and the main axle shaft. No.-size Marking Balls /cage on Axle

A

14-3/16" 65-SP

30

49.5 30

14-3/16" 68-SP 14-3/16" 68-SP

28 29

14-3/16" 68-SS 14-3/16" 68-SS

Cups

Chainwheels

Models

109

thick, rifled *

1 or 2

(C-)Record

52.0 28 52.0 29

109 111

thick, rifled * thick, rifled *

1 or 2 1 or 2

(C-)Record (same as 109mm 68-SS) (C-)Record

28 30

52.0 28 52.0 33

109 thick, rifled * 114.5 thick, rifled *

1 or 2 Double

(C-)Record (same as 109mm 68-SP) Super Record Road

14-3/16" 70-SP 14-3/16" 70-SP

27 28

54.0 27 54.0 28

109 111

1 or 2 1 or 2

(C-)Record (same as 109mm 70-SS) (C-)Record

14-3/16" 70-SS 14-3/16" 70-SS

27 30

54.0 27 54.0 32

109 thick, rifled * 115.5 thick, rifled *

1 or 2 Double

(C-)Record (same as 109mm 70-SP) Super Record Road

14-7/32" 68-SP

29

52.0 29

111

thick, rifled *

1 or 2

(1990-current) Record

14-7/32" 70-SP

28

54.0 28

111

thick, rifled *

1 or 2

(1990-current) Record

B

D

C

thick, rifled * thick, rifled *

* Aluminum with steel insert

D 1< - _.....-r---4--------~--____. !

IS

:z

o"

(/)

:c > :z

o

= o

o ~

'TJ

o

= ... =

n

nr--
:z ...

n (/)

BOTTOM BRACKETS



1990 rev.

FREEWHEELS

0

MULTI-SPEED FREEWHEEL-HUB SHELL

O ~.

BALL SIZES 1/8" · freewheelballs IS · a waste of time. It is better to use CountIng one or two too few balls than too many. THREAD SIZES ISO* English French Italian

1.375" x 24 TPI (34.92 mm x 1.058 mm) 1.370" x 24 TPI (34.80 mm x 1.058 mm) 34.7 mmx 1 mm (1.366" x 25.4 TPI) 35 mm x 24 TPI (1.378" x 1.058 mm)

Country of manufacture does not indicate thread dimensions.

Most freewheels imported into 'this country have English threads. English, Japanese and USA bicycles generally come with English threaded freewheels. French bicycles generally come with French threaded freewheels; however, recent Peugeots and some others use English threaded freewheels. Italian bicycles generally use Italian thread.ed freewheels. Stop and measure before forcing a freewheel.

..

A check with a thread pitch gauge will separate French from Italian and English threads. English and Italian hub threads can be distinguished by measuring with a vernier caliper. A 2" micrometer, however, is the preferred tool. This method may not work on some hubs. FREEWHEEL INTERCHANGEABILITY ISO

English

French

Italian

Hub

Hub

Hub

Hub

ISO Freewheel

A

A

A

English Freewheel

A

A

c** c**

French Freewheel

c**

Italian Freewheel

A

c** B***

A

B*** c**

c**

A

Class of Fit A Made to fit. B Will fit and be serviceable but will damage threads slightly. C Looks like it might work but won't.

*See Appendix for ~more details on ISO standards. **Difference in thread pitch makes this combination unacceptable. ***This combination works, but avoid changing back and forth betweeOn Italian and English freewheels. Not for strong or heavy riders.

rev. 19854-1

o

FREEWHEELS

ID MARKINGS ON FREEWHEEL BODIES Markings on freewheel bodies are only found on more recent models. Atom English French

rectangular punch mark on back of body no mark

1\laeda English French

no mark M stamped in inner ring of body on outside

Maillard-see Atom Normandy-see Atom Regina Old Marking English French Italian Current Marking ISO English French Italian

3 grooves in back 1 groove in back 2 grooves in back no grooves in back

Zeus English French

B stamped in back M stamped in back

F.I. stamped in back F.F. stamped in back nothing stamped in back

ID MARKINGS ON HUBS Campagnolo Old Marking-between spoke hole flange and freewheel threading English 1 groove French no groove Italian no groove Current Marking marked with thread size Ofmega-marking between spoke hole flange and freewheel threading 1 groove English 2 grooves French no grooves Italian Zeus English French

4-2 rev.

J985

B.S.C. stamped on center shaft of the hub nothing stamped on center shaft of the hub

FREEWHEELS

G

FREEWHEEL SPACERS Campagnolo Sturmey Archer HMW127 Raleigh Cyclo (French)

1, 1.5, 2mm 1/16" (1.6mm) 1/32" (.8mm), 1/8" (3.2mm) 1.2, 1.7mm

MOUNTING FREEWHEELS FACTORS TO CONSIDER 1. Hole in freewheel has to be large enough to fit over locknuts of hub. 2. Before you put it on, make sure you can get it off. See "Problems to Avoid." 3. Match the threads with the hub. 4. Be aware of any chainline changes. Note the offset differences on the freewheel back. Also see hub section page 10-5. 5. Check outside clearance, especially clusters with outside chainguard. Will they clear seat stay, chain stay and derailleur mounting bolt? 6. Be sure faces of freewheel and hub that butt together -are compatible, i.e. Regina Scalare (close ratio) has recessed face that may not butt properly on some hubs. 7. Is a new chain necessary?

+

PROBLEMS TO AVOID Don't use an old style Shimano splined' freewheel on Campagnolo, Shimano Dura Ace or similar hub. It comes off only after removing axle from other side. Mount splined Atom, Zeus, or Regina to a Campagnolo or similar hub only if you have a Phil tool. Before installing a freewheel on a sealed bearing hub, be sure you can get it off. Atom-type splined freewheels can only be removed with a Phil remover or by disassembly. Old style Shimano splined freewheels must be disassembled to be removed from Phil, Hi-E, Weyless, and other sealed bearing hubs. Always remove the freewheel before cutting the spokes out of a wheel. 12mm tandem axles are too big for the holes in many freewheel pullers. Current Bicycle Research tools have clearance for 12mm axles.

4-3

G

FREEWHEELS REMOVING FREEWHEELS FACTORS TO CONSIDER Fit for notch tools 1. Tool must be in good shape. 2. Dogs must closely fit notches. 3. Tool must butt against body, not bottom of notch. 4. Tool must be properly located against body or axle or both, to ensure the dogs stay properly engaged when force is applied. 5. Tool must be secured with quick release or axle nut to break freewheels loose. 6. With remover clamped in a vise, press down at rim while turning to remove. Dogs that are too long prevent the rim from seating on the body. This allows the remover to rock and the dogs to climb up and strip the body. If stripped, chisel off the chewed-up part on a Regina notched-type freewheel. Often it will chip off square. Then start again. Current Bicycle Research tools all have clearance for I2mm tandem axles. FREEWHEEL REMOVING TOOLS Combinations of freewheels and pullers are listed as "A", "B", or "B-". An "A" fit is probably the most successful combination and, if properly secured and located, won't result in any damage to the freewheel or tool. With a "B" fit there is some chance of damage to the freewheel and tool. A "B-" fit is more likely to damage both tool and freewheel; but if you have to remove freewheel to throw it out, it might be worth it. ,Not all combinations that work are listed. If you try others, be sure to follow the recommendations listed under' 'Factors to Consider." If all else fails, you can remove a freewheel by dismantling it. Exceptions to this are the old style Winner. MARKINGS ON VAR TOOLS WITH QUICK RELEASE THREADS See page 10-10.

4-4

FREEWHEELS

G

TOOLS FOR REMOVING MULTI-SPEED FREEWHEELS

Make of Freewheel

Class of Fit-Tool

Notes

Atom - splined

A Atom (splined) Bicycle Research CT-1 Atom Phil Tool Var 407,401 Zeus (splined) Regina 805032

With Phil Tool, removing axle spacers is not necessary. Be sure tool is well seated. Keep a sawed-off one for hubs that don't allow tool to seat fully. Atom-style splined removers are not all the same size due to tolerances. Keep several around to match different freewheels. Too loose a fit or one that doesn't go in all the way can cause trouble.

-notched

B Var 186 VarOl B- Bicycle Research CT-1 Regina Caimi-Everest-Simplex B Bicycle Research CT-1 Regina Campagnolo 704 Kingsbridge 101 Shimano Dura-Ace (new style) B- Cyclo (English) Kingsbridge 100 Shimano Dura-Ace (old style) Var 186 Var 188 VarOl Campagnolo A Campagnolo 0520/40 Kingsbridge 115 Var404 Bicycle Research CT-9 Cyclo (English) A Cyclo (English) Kingsbridge 100 A Cyclo (French) DR.64 Cyclo (French) B Kingsbridge 100 Var 188 Cyclo-Pans (French)

Maeda

A Use tool that comes with the freewheel DR.68, DR.P -See SunTour

French and English Cyclos are completely different. French Cyclo tools will fit over the large locknuts found on New Star hubs. English and French Cyclos are completely different. SunTour tool can be modified to work by filing the outside of the dogs.

1990

4-5

FREEWHEELS TOOLS FOR REMOVING MULTISPEED FREEWHEELS (cont.) Make of Freewheel

Class of Fit-Tool

Maillard, Sachs -splined Aris (1990) -notched Aris, 700

see Shimano splined after 1985 (UG) A Maillard 409,410 & 411 Kingsbridge 110 Var413 B- Shimano Dura-Ace (old style) Var 186 See Atom (splined) -splined (old) -large diameter A Var 412 large diameter remover with 6 bumps hole with 6-s10ts -Helicomatic A Maillard 415 wrench Var 524 wrench Merveille A EldiBGM Var 187 B B- Regina single-speed remover Var01 See Atom splined Milremo-splined -Pans See Cyclo Pans -2 notch See Atom notched Normandy

Regina - splined

-notched

Sachs-Huret

4-6

1990

A Bicycle Research CT-3 Normandy Maillard 408 Var405 A Regina 805032 Phil Atom Tool Var401 See also Atom splined A Bicycle Research CT-1 Regina Kingsbridge 101 Shimano Dura-Ace (new style) B Kingsbridge 100 B- Cyclo (English) (some) Var01 Var 186 Var 188 See Maillard

Notes

411 has a special skewer.

Remove ring with special wrench, then pull freewheel off. Threads that mate with the hub go straight through. You will have to remove the two smallest sprockets before using the Eldi tool. Var 01 may have to be filed slightly to match.

Campagnolo adaptor (704/1) for 13tooth cogs and 6 speeds lacks the ring that prevents sideways slippage. The Campagnolo remover #1 remover can be modified to fit a freewheel with 13 teeth by grinding off the outside dogs. This modification means you can't tum the remover block over when it becomes. worn or use it for single speed sprockets. New Bicycle Research fits 12-tooth Regina.

FREEWHEELS

0

TOOLS FOR REMOVING MULTISPEED FREEWHEELS (cont.) Make of Freewheel

Class of Fit-Tool

Notes

See Atom splined or Shimano Pre-'85 splined'for small-diameter internal splined cogs. See Normandy for large-diameter intemal-splined cogs. See SunTour or Atom for notched cogs. Shimano Splined Freewheels Pre-1985 A Bicycle Research Tool outside diameter 20.1 mm. -old style CT-4 Shimano Shimano old style splined freewheel splined Shimano TL-FW20 will not fit on a Shimano Dura-Ace A Type (A type) hub. A 17-mm hex locknut will just Var411 fit through the splines in an old-style splined freewheel. After 1985 A Bicycle Research Tool outside diameter 22.6 mm. -new style CT-6 Shimano Removing axle spacers is not splined CT-6MB necessary. BType Shimano TL-FW30 (B type-UG) Bicycle Research CT-6MB is a heavy duty version for mountain Uniglide MF-1500 Var414 bike and tandem use. Nuts and MF-1600 spacers must be removed to use it. 600 EX MF-6208 Sante MF-5000 Dura-Ace MF-7400 (no name) MF-Z012 Schwinn Approved

Shimano Notched Freewheels -Dura-Ace B Shimano Dura-Ace very old style (very old style) B- Var 186 A Bicycle Research CT-l Regina Kingsbridge 101 See also 600 EX Shimano TL-FWI0 MF-7160 B Cyclo (English) MF-6160 Kingsbridge 100 MF-6150 Var 188

-Dura-Ace old style, 600

-600 EX (with black ring inside smallest sprocket) MF-6207

See above tools for Dura-Ace old style, 600

Very old style has flush surface (threaded flange doesn't protrude above the freewheel's adjusting cone). On old-style freewheels the threaded flange protrudes above adjusting cone face. Shimano Dura-Ace very old and old-style freewheel tools are not interchangeable; be sure to use the correct one. Tighten the tool down extra snug. Old style has ring to locate tool on body. Very old style tool has two dogs. Remove black ring with a pin tool, then use tools listed for Dura-Ace old style, 600. To avoid removing ring use Bicycle Research CT-600 carefully.

1990

4-7

FREEWHEELS TOOLS FOR REMOVING MULTISPEED FREEWHEELS (cont.) Make of Freewheel

Class of Fit-Tool

Notes

-Freehub for pressed on freewheel body

A Shimano Freehub removal tool (TL-FH30)

-Freehub Dura-Ace, Dura-Ace EX -Freehub freewheel body held on with 10mm hex bolt -Freehub on steel hub shell

A Shimano Freehub (TL-FW10)

Tool works like a gear puller. For pressed-on Freehub-typeJ body found on 600AX, AX, 600 EX 7speed. Bolt-like tool

Shimano Freehub

A 10mm hex wrench

Not removable

-Hyperglide A Shimano TL-HG15 Bicycle Research sprocket locknut CT-6 Shimano Shimano Other -Automatic

A Shimano Automatic

-FF System Friction Freewheel

A Shimano A type

Simplex SunTour (Maeda) Winner, WinnerPro, and ex -4 notch -MicroLite 6 notch Perfect Pro Compe, 8.8.8. and NewWinner -2 notch

-4 notch (old)

4-8

1990

Freewheel must be partly dismantled before removal. Reassembly is easy. Remove outer locknut anti spacers to gain access to splines.

See Caimi-Everest-Simplex A Bicycle Research CT-10 SunTour TA-320

Bicycle Research has reinforced dogs.

A SunTour MicroLite (6 dog) A Bicycle Research CT-7 SunTour Kingsbridge 111 SunTour (2 dog) Var706 B Cyclo (English) -some B- Maillard 700 Var413 A SunTour (4 dog) (old)

Bicycle Research or Kingsbridge tool can be used without temoving locknuts and without quidk release to hold it in place. Use vice and press down at rim while turning. SunTour tool will not fit on 6 or 7-speed freewheels. (2 notch)

FREEWHEELS TOOLS FOR REMOVING MULTISPEED FREEWHEELS (cont.) Make of Freewheel IDC -3 or 4 notch

-4 notch

Zeus 2000

Class of Fit-Tool

Notes

A Bicycle Research CT-5 TDC IDC Var402 A Bicycle Research CT-5 TDC IDC Var402 B Var 01 Var 186 A Bicycle Research CT-2Atom Phil Tool Var 401 Var407 Zeus (splined)

1990

4-9

FREEWHEELS SPROCKET REMOVAL Modem freewheels have splined inner sprockets held in place by threaded outer ones. This allows easy removal of all sprockets, even with the freewheel in place. Removing the sprockets from an older, all threaded freewheel body is different. One or two of the larger sprockets are leftthreaded and remove from the inside; the rest are right threaded and remove from the outside. Do not attempt to hold the bare freewheel body when removing the last threaded sprocket. Instead, thread on two sprockets and lock them against each other (like cone and locknut), not against the freewheel body shoulder. Use this pair of sprockets to hold the freewheel while loosening the last sprocket.

SPROCKET REPLACEMENT It is usual to replace worn sprockets when installing a new chain because the new chain does not run smoothly on sprockets which have worn to the old chain's longer links. Often only the two outer sprockets need to be replaced.

INTERCHANGEABILITY CHARTS The charts on the following pages cover sprocket interchangeability for the freewheel models listed below:

Model ARIS Atom 77 Threaded Campagnolo Cyclo Everest G. Caimi Maillard 600, 700, Helicomatic Normandy Regina Syncro 90, CX, BX Extra, Scalare, 3-speed Sachs-Huret, ·Orbit, ARIS Schwinn Model F2, F3, J Model F

4·10

1990 rev.

Page 4-12 4-12 4-16 4-17 4-29 4-17 4-17 4-12 4-18 4-14 4-14 4-12 4-18 4-16

Model Shimano Freewheel Shimano Non-Hyperglide Freehub Cassettes Shimano Hyperglide Sprocket Groups SunTour New Winner, Winner-S, Perfect, Pro-Compe, Microlite SunTour Accushift, Winner, Winner Pro, a SunTour Interchange New WinnerWinner/Winner Pro TD Cross

Page 4-12 4-20 4-22 4-24 4-26 4-28 4-16

FREEWHEELS

FREEWHEEL SPROCKET INTERCHANGEABILITY (cont.)

How to Use the Interchangeability Charts Horizontal rows represent freewheel models and vertical columns represent sprocket positions (1 inside to 7 outside). Sprockets inside each outlined box are interchangeable with one another. One-way interchangeability is indicated Restricted by an arrow crossing a heavy line interchangeability is indicated by a dotted arrow •• ~ (if one-way) or by a dotted line ----- (if two-way) and is explained in a lettered footnote.

+ .

For each sprocket listed, the manner in which it attaches to the cluster is indicated. Also indicated is any provision a sprocket may have to hold the next smaller sprocket. The following symbols are used:

Symbol

To attach to cluster sprocket has:

To accept nextsmaller sprocket, sprocket has:

Splines Inside threads (left-handed) Inside threads (right-handed) Outside threads (right-handed)

)$"'$"'$(

Inside threads (right-handed)

Inside threads, same diameter

)5'.!!!!

Inside threads (right-handed)

Inside threads, lesser diameter

Outside threads (right-handed) Inside threads (right-handed)

Inside threads

-

tOOttt

'.!!!! _

'5 $$231

Outside threads

Arrow indicates the direction of sprocket removal. Note that splined and right-threaded sprockets always come off to the right (outside) of the cluster, leftthreaded sprockets come off to the left (inside).

1990

4-11

FREEWHEELS MAILLARD, ATOM 77, SACHS-HURET FREEWHEEL SPROCKET INTERCHANGEABILITY

1

Maillard 600 SH Helicomatic 5-speed

.. -

~

14-20T IMHI

14-18T

ISHAI

ISHB\

~

-

Maillard 700 SH Helicomatic 6-speed narrow SHCbody Atom 77 B 5-sprocket body 6-speed narrow

14-18T MC G

15-23T IMBl

~

Maillard 700 Course 5-speed regular MMbody

-----t--15TE

~ --.

..

16-21 T IMRI

IMAI

4-12

1990

-

~17-26,28,30,32T

...

13-16T MC G

~

..-

... 1'15-18T IBYI

11' 16-21T tGyl

;

~ ,.--------

16-21T :" ICYI15T : IBY116-18T IBYI I I I I

~

....-

13T

-

~

IMSI

Maillard 700 Compact 7-speed narrow CCbody

~

13SHF

14-18T

15-23T IMBI

-

IAYI

-

14-16T IMDI A

17, 19,21T

~

...

-

14-

~

Maillard 700 Compact 6-speed narrow CC body

~

-

--.

17-26, 28, 30T IMAI

24T D

"tttt~$$O$(

15-

~

Sachs-Huret Orbit 6-Speed

12,13T ISHEI

-

..

F

Maillard 700 Course 6-speed regular MMbody

13-15T ISHDI

"tOOt~$$$$'

17-

19-22,24,26,28, 32,34T

Atom 77 B 6-sprocket body 6-speed narrow

ARIS 6-Speed regular CSbody H

7

A

15-30,32T IMal

Maillard 700 SH Helicomatic 7-speed narrow SHC body

7-Speed narrow CC body H

6

345

2

Maillard 600 SH Helicomatic 6-speed narrow

ARIS

(outside)

Sprocket Positions

(inside)

Freewheel

...

~14-17T IHYI

13-16T MT G

... • IT 13-16T IT 12-14T IIY I

~

-

.. .. 14-17T IDyl

-

12-16T MT G

13-16T IEYI

-

ILYI --+

~

FREEWHEELS MAILLARD, ATOM 77, SACHS-HURET FREEWHEEL SPROCKET INTERCHANGEABILITY

en

Notes: A.

B.

D. E. F.

G. H.

c:::

Maillard 700 5th-position sprocket has a wide inner flange and may be used on a 600 SH 5-speed directly; it is too wide for use on a SH 6-speed. 600 SH 6-speed outer sprockets Ref. MH require Maillard spacer Ref. 2261 when used on a SH 5-speed. Some Maillard 700s have a body 5 sprockets wide, with an outer sprocket pair and a 13T minimum. Others have a body 6 sprockets wide, with all sprockets threaded on and a 14T minimum. The Atom 77 freewheels listed here are narrow 6-speeds. All sprockets of 6sprocket body Atom 77 attach directly onto body. The 6th-position sprocket of 5-sprocket body Atom 77 attaches to 5th-position sprocket. The 5sprocket body Atom 77 can be built up as a 7-speed using Maillard SHB, SHD and SHE sprockets in 5th, 6th and 7th position. Sachs Orbit inner sprocket is dished and so not interchangeable with others. 14, 15T Maillard 700 sprocket's inner flange is not high enough to secure neighboring lugged sprocket on Orbit. Also interchanges with 3-lug sprockets on Normandy; Schwinn Approved Models F2, F3 and J; Shimano MF 1501, A-type and B-type. See page 4-18. Sprockets are sold as a pair but can be separated. ARIS sprockets can be used in place of the corresponding Maillard 700 sprockets. Maillard 700 sprockets cannot be used on ARIS freewheels if indexing is to be used.

~

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= r» :2

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en

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o

MAILLARD SPROCKET SPACERS Freewheel Model

Body

Speeds & Spacing

Spacer

I.D.

O.D.

Thickness

Helicomatic

SHC

6-, 7-speed narrow

2263 silver steel or black plastic

45.5mm 45.5mm

50mm 50mm

3.0mm 3.0mm

700 Course

MM

5-, 6-speed regular

2160 red 2163 red

50mm 44mm

56.5mm 54mm

3.6mm 3.65mm

700 Compact

CC

6-, 7-speed narrqw

2141 green

50mm

56.5mm

3.0mm

ARIS

CS CS CC

6-speed regular 6--speed regular 7-speed narrow

3564 white (A) 3583 white (B) 3569 black (F)

50mm 44mm 50mm

56.5mm 53mm 56.5mm

3.45mm 3.45mm 2.95mm

= = n - U

! I

E

I I

V1

..... cc

I I

I I

I I

a::

1

I I I

I I I

I

o U.

A: 9mm B: 5.85mm

c:

4.5mm

D: 5mm

~

E: 12mm

o

occ Q

Campagnolo Type Boss (sometimes referred to as Italian)

Z

< :c C/) ~

Q

Shimano A Type Boss Shimano levers designed for Campagnolo type bosses can be mounted to Shimano A-Type bosses using Shimano Conversion Kit (680 9858) for M4.5 lever boss.

Z

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:J

Shimano B Type Boss

C/)

5-6

1990

INDEXING

FREEWHEEL-DROPOUT SPACING This chart is based on a normal dropout thickness (dimension C) of 6.5mm*. Dimension B is the handiest since a quick check can be made with the wheel and freewheel mounted in the bicycle.

Freewheel 7-speed narrow sp~ced 6-speed regular spaced Shimano Dura-Ace 8-speed spaced 7-speed narrow spaced 6-speed regular spaced 7-speed narrow spaced Shimano Other 6 speed regular spaced 7-speed narrow spaced SunTour 6-speed regular spaced 5-speed regular spaced

Campagnolo

A

B

36.0 36.0 40.5 36.0 34.5 36.5 35.0 36.5 36.5 36.5

9.5-11.5 9.5 - 11.5 10.0 - 11.5 10.5 - 12.0 11.5 - 14.0 11.0 - 13.0 12.0 - 14.5 11.5 - 13.5 11.5 - 13.5 12.5 - 15.5

36.5 36.0 38.0 37.0

*Shimano recommends that the dropout be 7.5mm plus or minus 0.5mm thick. Dropouts are often closer to 6.5 mm. When dimension B is too great, add a spacer between the freewheel and the hub. Be sure to check the clearance between the frame and the chain when the chain is on the smallest cog. Extra thick dropouts on aluminum frames may cause dimension B to go over the recommended amount. This can cause difficulty shifting the largest cogs as the derailleur swings to its inside limits.

CHAIN RECOMMENDATIONS Bushingless chain has the ability to twist more than chain with bushings. Some systems work best with a chain that will twist and some with a chain that resists twist. Be sure to follow the recommendations in each manufacturer's section.

Chain with Bushing

Chain without Bushing 1990

5-7

INDEXING TROUBLESHOOTING CHART

....~

Shift Lever-Brazed-on Bosses

Z

Trouble

Cause

Remedy

:

Lever doesn't fit or is too loose.

Brazed-on boss dimensions incorrect.

Carefully remove paint and chrome.

~

u

'-U ~ '-U

Lever movement is too tight Lever friction adjusting or selector is difficult to tum. screw is too tight.

~

U

>

....

U

=

o= u..

o o

= Z

Q

~

:

Index selector doesn't work.

Check lever boss flat dimensions.

Boss hole not centered.

Replace boss.

Clean threads using correct tap. See lever boss dimensions.

Spacer or washer missing.

Check assembly against exploded drawing in catalog.

Boss is too long.

Carefully grind a little off the end of the boss.

Flats are not deep enough.

Carefully file the flats deeper.

Lever boss flats perpendicular to down tube.

Replace boss.

C/)

SunTour: If flats are installed exactly 90° to down tube the lever will shift ultra freewheels when indicating "RE," and will shift regular spaced freewheels when on "UL." Some SunTour clamp mount lever flats are 90° to the down tube. The levers attached to these clamps can be used when the lever bosses are perpendicular to the down tube. GPX levers don't engage the flats and can be used.

Q

Z

~ ~

= : '-U

SunTour: Using clamp

~

See above note.

mount levers on brazed-on bosses.

:J Lever stop does not fit down tube.

5-8

Grind a small amount off the end of the friction screw. Note: Grind as little as possible.

Braze or glue in lever boss threading.

~

C/)

Loosen lever friction adjusting screw slightly.

Lever boss is too large for lever.

Lever friction adjusting screw Lever boss threading is not deep enough. won't tighten enough.

~

Check dimensions of boss. Oversize dimensions can be carefully filed down. Undersize boss may be unusable.

1990

Down tube diameter is greater than 28.6mm.

Replace radiused lever stop with flat lever stop.

INDEXING

TROUBLESHOOTING CHART (cont.) Shift Lever-All Mountings Trouble

Cause

Remedy

Index selector doesn't work.

Mode selector is set between functions.

Check that the mode selector is lined up correctly with desired function.

Lever movement too tight or selector is difficult to tum.

Lever friction adjusting screw is too tight.

Loosen lever friction adjusting screw slightly.

Lever doesn't index with 7speed freewheel.

Lever not designed for 7speed freewheels.

Check lever compatibility chart for correct lever.

Campagnolo: Incorrect

Check Campagnolo lever chart for correct insert.

insert.

SunTour: IPC or IFC lever selector ring set to "RE."

Lever doesn't index with 5or 6-speed freewheel.

Set selector ring to "UL." Also see SunTour note on previous page under "Index selector doesn't work."

Lever not designed for regular spaced freewheels.

Check lever compatibility chart for correct lever.

Campagnolo: Incorrect

Check Campagnolo lever chart for correct insert.

insert.

SunTour: Selector ring set

Set selector ring to "RE" or index.

to "UL," "power" or friction.

SunTour: a-3000 lever or a- 3000 derailleur doesn't

a-3000 lever must be used with a-3000 derailleur.

Match components.

index.

1990

5-9

INDEXING ~

TROUBLESHOOTING CHART (cont.)

~

Derailleur

~

Trouble

Cause

Remedy

Rear derailleur doesn't move far enough to shift on to large cogs.

Cable not tight enough.

Tighten cable with derailleur adjusting barrel.

Z

:t

U UJ ~

OR chain skips cogs when shifting to larger cogs.

UJ ~

U

OR slight clatter after shifting to larger cog.

U CC

Shift to largest cog hesitant.

Low limit adjustment screw needs loosening.

Loosen low limit adjusting screw.

c::

Shifts from large to small cogs hesitant.

Cable too tight.

Loosen cable with derailleur cable adjusting barrel or cable anchor bolt.

~

OR chain skips cogs when shifting from large to smaller cogs.

Shifts to smallest cog hesitant.

High limit adjusting screw too tight.

Loosen high limit adjusting screw.

Chain will not shift off or is hesitant to shift off the largest cog (chain is noisy when the crank is turned backwards).

Rear derailleurs guide pulley too close to largest freewheel cog. Either the angle adjustment screw is incorrectly adjusted or the largest cog exceeds the derailleur capacity.

Check the derailleur capacity. If it should be able to handle the largest cog, tum the angle adjusting screw in to rotate the guide pulley away from the freewheel.

> ~

ou. o

oCC

OR grinding noise after shifting to smaller cog.

Q

Z

~

:t

'"Z ~

Q

~ ~

c::UJ

Random misshifts.

:t

Hard to tum the rear derailleur adjusting barrel.

E--

:J

'"

5-10

1990

The casing end is not capped at the derailleur.

SunT.~ur:

For derailleurs without adjusting screw

check Drr block for correct installation. See Derailleur Capacity Chart. Cap the casing end with the correct cap. SunTour has 5 different ones to match different combinations of cables and stops. Shimano has 3.

INDEXING

TROUBLESHOOTING CHART (cont.) Other Symptoms Trouble

Cause

Remedy

Indexing gradually deteriorates.

Cable was not stretched and/or casing not seated before adjustment.

Stretch cable and check seating and readjust.

Cable anchor bolt loose.

Tighten cable anchor bolt.

Freewheel not fully tightened on hub, or freewheel sprockets not fully tightened on freewheel body.

Tighten freewheel and sprockets.

Derailleur mounting bolt loose.

Tighten mounting bolt.

Wom out freewheel or chain.

Replace.

Cable casing ends not cut flat adding spring to system or cable binds.

Grind or cut cable ends flat, eliminate cable binding.

Shift lever selector ring set incorrectly.

Set selector ring for freewheel being used.

Incompatible freewheel.

Replace with compatible freewheel.

Derailleurs high gear limit screw out of adjustment.

Set lever to "friction" or "power setting." Readjust high gear limit screw so guide pulley is directly under smallest sprocket. Screw adjusting barrel in all the way and re-tension cable.

Dropout misaligned.

Straighten dropout, readjust derailleur and retension cable.

Freewheel sprockets face the wrong way, or are single bevel instead of double, or spacers are incorrect.

Check cable and casing routing for binding before blaming freewheel spacing. 'If needed install correct sprockets and spacers in correct positions.

Hub-freewheel-dropout spacing incorrect.

See component section for correct spacing.

Consistent misshifts Misses only certain cogs (other than the smallest and largest).

continued next page

1990

5-11

INDEXING

TROUBLE SHOOTING CHART (cont.) Other Symptoms (cont.) Trouble

Cause

Consistent misshifts (cant.) Cable too stiff or too large Misses only certain cogs in diameter.

Remedy Use correct cable.

(other than the smallest and largest).

Works on one chainring but not another

Random Misshifts

Cable not stiff enough or too small in diameter.

Use correct cable.

Campagnolo

See notes in Campagnolo section.

Bad chainline.

Adjust chainline.

Dirty derailleur.

Clean derailleur.

Incorrect chain length.

Adjust chain length. See page 5-3, #6.

Cable not sliding freely.

Points to check: 1. Quality 1.2mm cable, correct cable casing and correct cable ends. 2. Cable casing ends cut flat. 3. Cable stops and levers are secured tightly to frame. 4. Cable and casing free from dirt and properly lubricated. Lining is no substitute for lubrication. 5. Casing may be too long or short causing binding. 6. Bottom bracket cable guide causes binding. If lubrication improves performance it will probably be temporary. Replace guide with clamp-on type. 7. Cable is attached on correct side of anchor bolt.

continued next page

5-12

1990

8. Internal cable housing can cause binding. Check by moving the shift lever a slight amount. The derailleur must move a corresponding amount, otherwise re-route the cable.

INDEXING

TROUBLESHOOTING CHART (cont.) Other Symptoms (cont.) Trouble

Cause

Remedy

Random Misshifts (cont.)

Chain and/or freewheel dirty, rusty or worn.

Clean and lubricate or replace with new compatible chain. If trouble persists replace freewheel with new compatible freewheel.

Chain is not compatible.

Check chart and install correct chain.

Chain is incorrect length.

Add or subtract chain.

SunTour: Shift into high gear. Add or subtract links until dot on pulley cage lines up with mark on derailleur body.

SunTour Pro, Regina CX-S or Regina 50 Anniversario chain installed upside down or inside out.

Turn right side up.

Regina CX-S must also have silver-colored plate facing out.

Regina 50 Anniversario must have black plate facing in.

Derailleur dirty or worn.

Clean or replace. Check guide pulley.

Derailleurs guide and tension pulleys are reversed.

Shimano: Guide pulley (marked Centeron or Ceramic Bushing) can move side to side. Tension has no side-to-side play.

SunTour: Guide pulley( marked "G" has square tooth profile. Tension pulley (marked "T") has a pointed tooth profile.

Random MisshiftsUnusually noisy drive train.

Rear dropout misaligned.

Straighten rear dropouts.

1990

5-13

,.

••

••• INDEXING ®

1990 rev.



INDEXING ••• ••• ®

CAMPAGNOLO SYNCRO AND SYNCRO II

Design Elements • Several different inserts are available for the levers to allow for different derailleurs and freewheels spacing. .. Works best with Campagnolo Approved Regina 90 S Freewheel and Regina 50 Anniversario chain. • Levers require the rider toovershift slightly when shifting onto larger sprockets. Campagnolo's shift lever inserts allow the'same levers to be used for different freewheel spacings and a variety of different derailleurs with very different geometries, Overshift is required to ,complete a shift onto a larger ,cog. Overshift pushes the chain past the cog centerline to shift. The lever is then released, which allows the guide pulley to fytum to a position where it is centered under the cog.

CbainRecommendations A high quality chain with bushings is fe.commended. Regina 5-0 Anniversario chain works best. About the Derailleur Capacity ·Cha.rts The numbers listed in the derailleur capacity charts have been cO,mpiled from Campagnolo's liter;ature. We have found some .of these to be optimistic. Dr()poutgeometry~ ,cbainwheel sizes, hub position,chflin~tay geometry an.d other factors may increase or decrease a given derailleur's c·ap~city.

Max~Chainwheel

Difference == Largest chainwheel minus

the smallest Total Cap,acity =Largest freewheel sprocket minus smallest, plus the Max Chainwheel Difference. Max. Freewheel Teeth =Largest freewheel sprocket Blank spaces indicate no listing in the manufacturer's literature.

1990

6·1

,.

INDEXING ••• •• • ®

CAMPAGNOLOSYNCROIILEVERS Syncro II levers use different inserts to vary the amount of cable pulled between detents. The inserts are the same for Syncro and Syncro II. Campagnolo literature has shown many more combinations than are listed here. The ones listed here represent the best combinations. Please be sure to follow the Syncro II Setup Tips listed below. To change to friction mode, note lever position (gear) then pull knurled washer (#10) away from frame and tum the washer clockwise 90°. To go from friction mode to Syncro mode position the lever in the same gear as it was when the lever was changed from Syncro to friction. Then tum the washer 90° counterclockwise.

Syncro II Setup Tips in addition to all the indexing adjustment instructions on page 5-3:

1. Use what seems like too much grease when assembling each part of the lever. 2. Check that the release bush (part 5) matches perfectly with the flats on the boss. File the flats slightly to improve the match, if it can be done without making the clearance excessive. 3. The friction D-ring (part 6) should feel loose. Tighten the D-ring as.you would on a friction lever then back it off 1/2 to 1 full tum. You may want to Pllt a drop of Loctite on the threads. 4. Pre-bend the cable. Insert the cable into the lever with the head fully seated. Wrap the cable around the lever 90° to the way it normally goes and pull tight. This will put a bend in the·cable that will help it to settle quickly.

6-2

1990

INDEXING CAMPAGNOLO SYNCRO LEVER INSERTS

(I)

Model Categories

Shift Lever Inserts

Derailleur

Freewheel

c::

'-speed

• Blue-no mark

Athena Xenon Chorus-"A" mode Chorus-"B" mode Euclid Centaur Croce D'Aune

Campagnolo Approved Regina 90-S 7-speed** Shimano SIS 7-speed

m

Athena Xenon Chorus-"A" mode Chorus-"B" mode Euclid Centaur

Regina regular spaced 6speed Shimano SIS 6-speed

• Green-stamped A7 • Black-stamped B7

• Gray-no mark • Yellow-stamped "C"*

6-speed

• Red-stamped A6 • White-stamped B6

~

:c

= r;I>

:2

o"

(I)

:c;I> :2

o

* A yellow insert without a "C" stamped in it was also **

= o

produced. The notches in it, however, are spaced differently. Marked with the C in a diamond trademark inside the threaded portion that mates with the hub.

o ~

-n

o

= ....

The insert silhouettes are the same size as the actual inserts. By placing the insert on the silhouettes you can identify which one is which even if the paint has been dissolved.

~

I

I

~

I

~

~

'-' Red

I

m n

:c;I> :2 ....

Grey

~

I

m 3:

I

Black



r-

~

Green

Blue

Yellow

=

n < n

n

(I)

I

~ White

1990

6-3

INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS CAMPAGNOLO INDEXING DERAILLEUR CAPACITY Please see notes "About Derailleurs Capacity Charts" on page 6-1. Note: When using Shimano SIS cable casing, Campagnolo derailleurs require an end cap that steps down to 5.3mm. When using Accushift cable casing use the 5mm end cap.

CAMPAGNOLO INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS

Model

Model No.

Total Capacity

Maximum Freewheel Teeth Dropout L=24

• Record ("C.. Record") (1990 model) • Croce D'Aune (original) Short Cage Long Cage (1990 model)

N/A

27T

28T

BOlO-SM BOlO-LG N/A

33T 30T 27T

30T 28T 28T

25T 33T

27T* 32T

DOlO FOlO

35T 37T 30T 30T

30T* 32T 30T 30T

QOlO-SM QOlO-MD QOlO-LG

32T 38T 44T

30T 32T 32T

• Chorus Short Cage

COlO--SM

"A" setting "B" setting

Long Cage

COlO-LO

"A" setting "B" setting

• Athena • Xenon • Centaur Short Cage Medium Cage Long Cage • Euclid

MOlO-SM 32T Short Cage MOlO-MD Medium Cage 38T MOlO-LO 44T Long Cage . • Olympus Medium Cage ZOIO-MD 38T Long Cage ZOlO-LG 44T *We recommend a maximum freewheel of 19T in the "A" setting.

6-4

1990

30T 32T 32T 32T 32T

NON-INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS CAMPAGNOLO NON-INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS

Model

Model No.

Maximum Freewheel Teeth Dropout L=24mm

• Gran Turismo • Gran Sport (short cage) • Gran Sport GT (long cage)

2270 3500 3550

36T 26T 32T

• Nuovo Record • Rally

1020lA 3450

26T 36T

• Record ("e-Record") (original) • Super Record

4001

28T 28T

• Triomphe Corsa (short cage) • Triomphe Leisure (long cage) • Valentino Extra

OOIO-SM OOIO·LG 2170

28T 32T 26T

• Velox • Victory Corsa (short cage) • Victory Leisure (long cage)

2250 GOIO-SM GOIO-LG

26T 28T 32T

• 980

0102068

26T

1990

6-5

FRONT DERAILLEURS CAMPAGNOLO FRONT DERAILLEURS Half-Stepl Alpine

Clamp Diameter Max. or Braze-On Chainring Difference* (BID)

Model

Model No.

• Athena, Chorus, Croce D' Aune

C021 C022

half-step half~step

18T 18T

B/G 28.5

• Centaur • Centaur, Euclid

M022 M023 M024

alpine alpine alpine

26T 26T 26T

28.6 28-33 (adjustable) 35-36

• Chorus • Gran Sport • Nuovo Record

C023 3600 1050

half-step half-step half-step

18T lIT lIT

28-33 (adjustable) 28.5 28.5

• Olympus

Z022 Z021

alpine alpine

26T 26T

28.6 B/G

• Nuovo Record

1052/NT 1021/00

half-step half-step

18T 18T

28.5 B/G

• Record ("C-Record")

A021 A022

half-step half-step

18T 18T

B/G 28.5, 29.5**

• Super Record

1022/00 1023/00

half-step half-step

lIT lIT

28.5 B/O

• Triomphe-Corsa • Triomphe-Leisure

0022 0022-LX

half-step alpine

18T 23T

28.5 28.5

• Valentino • Nuovo Valentino

2050 0104008

half-step half-step

lIT

28.5 28.5

• Victory-Corsa

0022 0021 0022-LX 0021-LX

half-step half-step alpine alpine

lIT lIT 23T 23T

28.5 B/G 28.5 B/G

F022 F021

half-step half-step

18T 18T

28.5 B/O

• Victory-Leisure

• Xenon

28.5 lIT half-step 0104012 • 980 28.5 23T alpine 0104013 • 990 * Max. chainring difference listed is for round chainrings as opposed to oval chainrings. ** Limited production run for carbon fiber seat tubes.

6-6

1990

,..

INDEXING

•••••• ®

SACHS-HURET ARIS Design Elements • Overshift built into lever. Overshift is about 2mm of cable travel. • Floating guide pulley • Grooved and pinched freewheel teeth. • Systems are supplied with Sedisport bushingless chains, although we recommend a chain with bushings. Sachs-Huret uses overshift built into the lever like SunTour only more so (overshift of 2mm of cable travel for Sachs-Huret vs. Imm for SunTour). This pushes the chain centerline past the cog centerline to complete the shift. The guide pulley then settles into a position where it is centered under the cog. Like the Shimano system,.Sachs-Huret also has a floating guide pulley. This allows the guide pulley to center itself under the sprocket when it is not perfectly aligned. The grooved and pinched freewheel teeth are not as "active" as the Shimano twist teeth but work well when combined with overshift of the shift levers.

Chain Recommendations Bushingless chain is usually supplied with these systems. We have found, however, that a chain with bushings that has less side flex and twist works better.

Sedisport Pro and ATB Chain Because the Sedisport Pro and ATB chains have mushroomed over pins to help it withstand side thrust, Sachs recommends special care when removing the chain. These two chains have a special dimpled connecting pin that is located by a single black chain side plate. Push the pin on the dimpled end when removal is needed. Push on the mushroomed non-dimpled end when installing. About the Derailleur Capacity Charts The numbers listed in the derailleur capacity charts have been compiled from Sachs-Huret's literature. The capacities listed are for "normal conditions." Dropout geometry, chainwheel sizes, hub position, chainstay geometry and other factors may increase or decrease a given derailleur's capacity. Total Capacity = Largest freewheel sprocket minus smallest, plus the front gear difference. Max. Chainwheel Difference = Largest chainwheel minus the smallest Blank spaces indicate no listing in the manufacturer's literature.

1990

6-7

INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS SACHS·HURET INDEXED RIGHT SHIFT LEVERS Derailleurs on same or next line correspond cosmetically. Shift levers in the same box work with any of the derailleurs in the adjacent box Model Categories Models 7- & 6-

speed

6-speed

Shift Lever

Derailleur

MA 85.5* AR 47.2 D • New Success AR47.2 T • New Success Touring MA 82.4*, MA 82.7 P AR 41.3 D • Rival Sport AR41.3 T • Rival Touring • Rival ATB

MA 82.8 G

AR 41.4 T

I'-----~~~-----'-t---~~~~~~-__+__~~~~~~~"_'__+__~~~~

6- & 5-

• Rider IS

MA 88.30, MA 88.33

AR 46.2

Freewheel

Sachs-Maillard ARIS 7-speed narrow or 6-speed regular Sachs-Maillard RGS 5- or 6speed regular w/spoke guard

speed MA 93.1 G • Elysee (with "Positron-type" cable) MA90 • Explorer

AR 49.1 D

Sachs-Maillard ARIS Sachs-Maillard AR48 Explorer * E following these numbers stands for frame mount. G stands for handlebar mount.

SACHS·HURET INDEXED REAR DERAILLEUR CAPACITY Please see notes, "About the Derailleur Capacity Charts," on page 6-7. Maximum Freewheel

Model Categories Models ,- & 6-

speed 6-speed 6- & 5speed

• New Success • New Success Touring • Rival Sport • Rival Touring • Rival ATB • Rider

Model No.

AR 47.2 D AR 47.2 T AR 41.3 D AR 41.3 T AR 41.4 T AR 46.2

Maximum Dropout Chainwheel Total Difference Capacity L= 24 L= 28 16T

26T 16T 26T

26T

• Elysee (with AR 49.1 D 16T "Positron-type" cable) _ • Explorer AR 48

6-8

1990

28T 40T 28T 40T 40T 43T

26T 30T

28T

30T

28T

26T 30T

28T 32T 28T 32T

34T 34T 32T 28

NON-INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS SACHS-HURET NON-INDEXING REAR DERAILLEURS

Maximum Freewheel Teeth Model

Model No.

Total Dropout Capacity L=24mm

• Jubilee • Jubilee-long cage

AR44/2 2253

31T 40T

28T 28T

• Success • New Success • New Success-long cage

2470 47/2 AR 47/3

31T 30T 42T

28T 30T 36T

• Duopar

40/3 2648 H 2648 GC

34T 36T 36T

36T 36T 38T

• DuoparEco

2690 H 2690 GC

36T 36T

36T 38T

• Pilot

2900-00 H AR 45/2

30T 30T

• Rival • Rival-long cage

41/2 AR 41/3 2850-00

30T

• Rider • Rider-long cage

AR 46/2 AR 46/3

28T 43T

-Eco • Eco-Iong cage • Eco-S

AR 30/3 AR 31/2

AR 30/2

31T 38T 31T

L=28mm

28T 30T 28T

42T

36T 36T

28T 32T 36T 28T 28T 28T

1990

6-9

FRONT DERAILLEURS SACHS-HURET FRONT DERAILLEURS

(/)

u .....

Model

Model No.

Half-Stepl Alpine

Clamp Diameter Max. Chainwheel or Difference* Braze-On (B/O)

• Jubilee

AV66/2

half-step

16T

28-28.6

• Success • New Success • New Success, Pilot • New Success ARIS

AV975 AV 67/3 AV 67/2 AV66.5 D AV 66.6 D AV66.5T AV66.6T

half-step alpine half-step half-step half-step alpine alpine

16T 26T 16T 16T 16T 26T 26T

28-28.6 28-28.6, 29, 30 28-28.6, 29, 30 28-29 B/a 28-29 B/a

• Hi Stepper (Duopar)

AV67/3s

half-step

16T

28-28.6, 29, 30

• Rival

AV62/2 AV62/2 AV 62/3

half-step alpine half-step

16T 26T 16T

28-29, 30 28-29, 30 B/a

~

• Rival Sport ARIS

= Q

AV62.2D AV62.2 T AV62.3 D

half-step alpine half-step

16T 26T 16T

28-29, 30 28-29, 30 B/a

• Rival ATB ARIS

AV41.4T

alpine

26T

28-29, 30

• Eco S • Rider, Eco, Commander • Rider, Eco • Rider Sport ARIS

AV60/2 AV69/2 AV 69/3 AV62.4D

half-step half-step alpine half-step

16T 16T 26T 16T

28-29, 30 28-29, 30 28-29, 30 28-29

half-step ** • Club half-step ** • Club AS *Subtract 4 teeth when using oval chainrings **Model number not available.

16T 16T

28-28.6, 25.4 28-28.6, 25.4

z « :c u '-IJ"

.~

'-IJ ~

U

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U .....

= a: o u.. o o Z